Curriculum Guide 2018 - 2019

  • Lake Oswego High School 
    Established 1951
    2501 Country Club Road
    Lake Oswego, OR 97034

    Phone: 503.534.2313
    Fax: 503.534.2327
    http://losdschools.org/lohs

    Nationally recognized as a School of Excellence
    Ranked as Gold Medal School by US News and World Report
    Received Highest Ranking by the Oregon Department of Education

    We enthusiastically welcome you into our school community.
    We invite you to contribute.
    At Lake Oswego High School, we learn and lead together.
    The journey begins here, determining your specific path, for your next school year!

    Within the pages of this curriculum guide, you will find courses reflecting
    our strong emphasis on academics, including the visual and performing arts,
    robust programs for student support and special services, dynamic
    extra-curricular opportunities and highly competitive athletic teams.*
    With our "Exceptional" school rating, National Merit Finalists,
    Presidential Scholar Candidates, Award-Winners for Civic Service,
    and consistently high SAT, ACT, and Advanced Placement scores,
    LOHS is regarded as one of our nation's top-achieving high schools.

    All combined these make your high school years as a Laker a solid foundation in your life.
    Choose the most challenging plan for you!

Lake Oswego High School Mission

  • Our mission is to foster an inclusive and well-rounded community of critical thinkers who are prepared for citizenship, college, career, and life-long learning.

Lake Oswego High School Vision

  • We must inspire young adults to contribute and grow within a safe, supportive, learning environment that promotes the development of 21st Century skills, so that they will be prepared to thrive in a rapidly changing global society.

Lake Oswego High School Values

  •  

    • We value the collaboration of staff, students, family, and community.
    • We believe respect and acceptance are the foundation for strong relationships.
    • We value a rigorous curriculum that supports critical thinking and problem-solving.
    • We believe that curiosity inspires the learning process.
    • We value our students' talents, skills, and creative energy.
    • We believe in continually improving our school culture.
    • We are committed to helping each student feel emotionally and physically safe, supported, and valued as a member of our learning community.

Scheduling Information

  •  

    We encourage you to carefully use the Lake Oswego High School Curriculum Guide as you choose your classes for this school year. This guide is much more than a list of course offerings; it is a counseling tool to help you organize your high school educational plan and begin preparing for your post-secondary education and career goals. Whatever your goals, we urge you to seriously consider taking a rigorous, challenging course of study while attending Lake Oswego High School.

    With the guidance and expertise of counselors, students will begin the forecasting process in the spring to request their next year's courses. Parents are encouraged to take an active role in this process and carefully review the verification sheet mailed home in the spring to see if any changes are needed. Students are asked to put quality time into their decision process, as classes will be formed based on their requests. In selecting courses, students should be aware of the following:

    • Check prerequisites before signing up for a specific class.
    • Note that the following courses require an application: AP Biology, AP English Language and Literature, AP English Literature and Composition, AP European History, AP Physics C: Mechanics, AP Psychology, AP U.S. Government, AP U.S. History, Academic Mentor, Cadet Teaching, Sophomore and Freshman Honors English, International Marketing, Newspaper, Peer Mentor, Peer Tutor, Work Experience, Yearbook.
    • Be aware that the following courses require an audition: A Capella Choir, Bel Canto Choir, Jazz Band, Wind Ensemble, and Windjammers.
    • Consider that the following courses require Staff Recommendation/Signature: All Math and Science courses, AP Studio Art/2-D Design, AP Studio Art/3-D Design, AP Calculus, AP Chinese, AP French, AP Spanish, AP Statistics, Department Assistants, Independent Study, Library Assistant, String Orchestra, Peer Mentors, Symphonic Band, World Languages 4+.
    • Check credit options. Courses that students may repeat for credit (example: Weight Training) have designations at the end of their course description. If there is no statement saying students may take the course again, you may not earn additional credit by taking the class.
    • Students who participate in athletics/activities must have passed five credited classes in the semester prior to their activity and must remain enrolled in five credited classes while participating in the activity. Proficiency credit does not count as one of the five credited classes needed for eligibility.
    • Thoughtfully select alternate classes in case first choice electives are unavailable. Some electives may not be taught due to under enrollment; others will have more students sign up than space is available.
    • If you do not provide alternative electives, you will be scheduled into a Study Hall or open class you did not choose.
    • Forecasting for courses is completed online using LOHS SIS 'StudentVue'.
    • Math placement will be determined by student's current math teacher. Placement questions should be addressed with the student's current math teacher.
    • Options for the following year's Science classes, determined by current science teacher.
    • Department Assistant and Work Experience are not forecasted for, but set up at start of semester if applicable and/or Counselor recommended.
    • Materials and Fees: Students may participate in any course offered as part of the standard curriculum without cost. However, in some courses, students may pay material fees in order to keep the projects or workbooks that they create. The following is a list of courses to which fees may apply: Art Classes, Ceramics, Foods Courses, and World Languages.
    • If a student applies for but is not recommended for an honors or AP for which the prerequisites are met, the student and parent or guardian can override the recommendation and enroll in the course by contacting the Assistant Principal.

Graduation Requirements

  •  

    Lake Oswego High School students will work towards a Lake Oswego District Standard Diploma. This diploma will be awarded to a student who has met attendance requirements and has earned course credits based on passing performance requirements. All ninth graders will begin earning credits towards this diploma unless they are receiving special education and the Individualized Education Program (IEP) team determines a different diploma option is more appropriate. Listed below are the requirements for this diploma. Requirements are defined by units of credit. Passing a yearlong course earns one unit of credit and passing a semester earns a half unit of credit.

    During the four years of high school a student must earn twenty-five credits. The following are the course subject areas and credit amounts that must equate to the twenty-five credits:

    • Advanced Communications = .5 credit in Grade 9
    • Electives = 6.5 credits
    • English = 4 credits
    • Fine Arts = 1 credit (.5 recommended by end of Grade 10)
    • Health = 1 credit (.5 credit in Grade 9 or 10, and .5 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
    • Mathematics = 3 credits
    • Physical Education = 1 credit (.5 credit in Grade 9 or 10, and .5 credit in subsequent years)
    • Science = 3 credits
    • Social Studies = 3 credits
    • World Language = 2 credits (2 credits may transfer from Junior High)

    In District Junior High Students: A student who passed Algebra or a higher math class at a junior high will earn Elective units of credit for those classes. These students must still complete three credits of math in high school. A student who passed World Language classes in junior high will earn World Language credit for those classes at Lake Oswego High School. These courses will not count into a student's high school grade point average.

    Out of District Junior High Students: Students transferring in from junior highs outside the Lake Oswego School District must complete and submit a "Pre 9th Grade Verification Form" (available on Lake Oswego High School's website under Counseling) to have their Math and Language coursework applied to their high school transcript. Only high school equivalent courses will be eligible. The Pre 9th Grade Credit Form must be completed, signed, and dated by the previous pre 9th grade teacher and school.

    Essential Skills Required for Graduation

    The state requires that all students demonstrate they are proficient in certain "Essential Skills" before they are awarded a diploma. These skills are deemed critical for future success. The Essential Skills are process skills which enable students to learn content and apply their knowledge across disciplines. Students must demonstrate proficiency in the Essential Skills of reading, writing, and math. Students will have multiple options and opportunities to demonstrate their proficiency in these Essential Skills by meeting state standards through:

    • The Smarter Balanced Assessments
    • Samples of student work scored by trained teachers; or,
    • Additional standardized assessments (such as the SAT and ACT.

     

    Career-Related Graduation Requirements

    • The following requirements personalize the diploma for each student and help students plan for their post-high school education and career goals.
    • Education Plan and Profile: Students develop a plan and profile to guide their learning and document progress toward their personal, career, and post-high school goals.
    • Extended Application: Students apply and extend their knowledge in new and complex situations related to the student's personal career interests and post-high school goals through critical thinking, problem solving, or inquiry in real world contexts.
    • Career-Related Learning Experiences: Students participate in experiences that connect classroom learning with real life experiences in the workplace, community and/or school relevant to their education plan.

     

    Early Graduation

    All requests for early graduation must be approved by the School Board. In order to be considered for early graduation, a student must be on track to have met State and District Attendance, Course Credit and performance requirements. Early graduation requests may include no more than a total of one credit as a student assistant or in work experience as part of the required twenty-five credits, unless the student is earning a modified or basic diploma.

    A student must apply for early graduation by the end of the sophomore year. 

Academic Policies and Information

  •  

    Grading

    The Lake Oswego School District's evaluation procedure is designed to reflect support of academic achievement and the development of citizenship. Letter grades are intended to provide information on academic performance, to encourage continued academic growth and to create a record of academic achievement.

    A letter grade is based on the teacher's professional evaluation of student achievement in the following areas: Completion of Assignments, Examination Scores, Mastery of Pertinent Skills and Handling Abstractions, and Application of Knowledge. Each teacher will provide each student with a written explanation of the expectations and the grading system for the course of study.

    The following letter grades indicate what the student has achieved in a class, relative to the five stated components of evaluation:

    A = Excellent

    B = Above Average

    C = Average

    D = Minimum Passing Grade

    F = Failing

    S = Satisfactory

    U = Unsatisfactory

    Weighted Grade Point Average and Weighted Courses

    At the end of each semester students receive a letter grade for each of their courses. Most courses at Lake Oswego High School are calculated on a 4 point scale, with a grade of A worth 4 points, B worth 3, C worth 2, D worth 1 and F worth 0.

    AP and Honors courses, along with a few other challenging courses, are designated as Weighted Courses. For these courses students earn 5 points for an A, 4 for B, 3 for C, 2 for D and 0 for F. The Weighted Courses at Lake Oswego High School are:

    All AP Classes, Calculus 3, Chinese 4, Freshman and Sophomore Honors English, French 4, Japanese 4, Pre-Calculus, and Spanish 4.

    Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Grades

    A student may elect to take one non-required course per semester on an S/U basis rather than the usual grading system. For World Languages, 3rd year and above qualify for S/U. Students desiring to take a course on an S/U basis need to declare this intention and complete appropriate paperwork by the end of the fifth week of the semester. This should be done in consultation with one's teacher, counselor, and parent.

    All Department Assistants (DAs), Work Experience, Community Service, Peer Tutors, and Cadet Teaching will automatically be graded S/U. An S/U class is not counted as eligible for the Honor Roll each semester.

    Incompletes

    With Assistant Principal approval, an Incomplete (I) grade will be assigned when circumstances beyond the student's or teacher's control prevent the student from completing the course work on time and there is a definite goal to finish the course. A student may also be given an incomplete grade in other circumstances if the teacher and the student's counselor agree it best serves the student with Assistant Principal approval. The course shall be finished timely by not more than two weeks beyond the end of the grading period. Failure to do so within twi weeks will result in an "F" grade, unless a prior arranged time extension has been made with the Assistant Principal.

    Honor Roll

    Each semester students who earn the weighted GPA of 3.5 and above are placed on the Lake Oswego High School Semester Honor Roll.

    National Honor Society

    The National Honor Society embraces four key values: Scholarship, Leadership, Service, and Character. The National Honor Society Application is built around these four key values beginning with scholarship.

    Students are required to have an accumulated GPA of weighted 3.50 or higher to meet the initial scholarship requirement to be considered for the National Honor Society. In addition to a student's GPA, applications to OMEGA National Honor Society at Lake Oswego High School will be considered holistically with respect to the three remaining key values. The successful application will demonstrate evidence of strength in each of the areas. 

    Advanced Placement and Honors Level Courses

    The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses that are challenging and stimulating, allowing for individual progress and accomplishment, and exploring subjects in greater depth. AP exams will be administered in the spring and give students the opportunity to earn advanced placement and/or college credit. Students may qualify for an Honors or AP class by applying in the spring of the previous year. If a student applies for but is not recommended for an honors or AP for which the prerequisites are met, the student and parent or guardian can override the recommendation and enroll in the course by contacting the Assistant Principal. Following is a list of Advanced Placement/Honors courses offered at Lake Oswego High School:

    AP Biology, AP Calculus AB, AP Calculus BC, AP Chemistry, AP Chinese, AP Economics, AP English Language and Composition, AP English Literature and Composition, AP European History, AP French, AP Music Theory, AP Physics C: Mechanics, AP Psychology, AP Spanish, AP Statistics, AP Studio Art/2-D Design, AP Studio Art/3-D Design, AP U.S. Government, AP U.S. History, Calculus 3, Freshman Honors English, Sophomore Honors English.

    STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering and Math

    Students have exciting opportunities to take challenging college-level science and math courses, participate in STEM related co-curricular clubs or internships, and pursue their intellectual curiosity as they prepare for college. A student who takes advantage of these opportunities will leave Lake Oswego High School well prepared for college and potentially have enough credits to enter college as a sophomore. STEM certificates are awarded at the end of senior year to the students who complete: 6 Science classes, 3 Technology and/or Engineering classes, and 4 Math classes. Each year of participation in STEM clubs or internships may be used to replace one class for the technology and engineering requirement.

    Technology Classes

    • Automotive Fundamentals (Dual Credit)
    • Broadcast Journalism
    • Digital Media
    • General Auto Repair I (Dual Credit)
    • Introduction to Programming
    • Newspaper
    • Programming Projects
    • Small Engine Repair (Dual Credit)
    • Yearbook

    Engineering Classes

    • Introduction to Engineering
    • Engineering Concepts

    Clubs and Internships

    • Robotics Team
    • Apprenticeship in Science and Engineering (ASE)
    • Architecture, Construction, Engineering (ACE)
    • Dental Explorers (OHSU)
    • Parnership in Science Inquiry – OHSU (PSI)
    • Primate Center: Science Ambassadors
    • UCEDD Summer Internship (OHSU)
    • ZooTeen (Oregon Zoo)
    • Other Independent Internships

    *New STEM courses may be added to this list each year. Courses offered are also subject to availability based on the student requests and district resources.

College Entrance Requirements

  • All graduates are encouraged to consider and participate in some type of education or training beyond high school. Since the majority of LOHS graduates proceed to a four-year college/university or community college, a great deal of attention is paid to preparing students for this next endeavor. The most important part of this process is for all students to enroll in a challenging and full course of study throughout their four years of high school. When the student accepts this responsibility, and meets the requirements for the Lake Oswego diploma, he/she has met most (if not all) of the curricular requirements for admission to the seven campuses of the Oregon University System. These requirements are:

    English

    (4 credits) includes the study of the English language, literature, speaking, listening, and writing. This study emphasizes frequent practice in writing expository prose.

    Mathematics

    (3 credits) including first-year Algebra, and two additional years of college preparatory mathematics (typically, Geometry and Advanced Algebra, or higher). Algebra and Geometry taken prior to ninth grade will be accepted as elective credit. Students are required to take three credits of mathematics in high school. Howeer, students are advised to continue taking mathematics through their senior year.

    Science

    (3 credits) including a year in each in two fields of college preparatory science (such as geoscience, biology, chemistry, or physics), with at least one course being a laboratory science. 

    Social Studies

    (3 credits) including one year of World History, U.S. History, and America and Contemporary World or AP U.S. History.

    Second Language

    (2 credits), which means two years of the same language. Students who have taken foreign language at the junior high will receive credit to be applied towards the 25-credit graduation requirement.

    Students should check with the colleges to which they are applying to make sure their requirements are being met. In addition to the course requirements, an applicant to a state university must achiee a certain GPA (which varies by the school), and must take at least one of the college admission tests: SAT and/or ACT.

    Most private colleges/universities and some state schools in other states have higher admission standards than those given above. Students and parents/guardians are encouraged to obtain specific information from the colleges they are considering from our counselors, and/or from college web sites.

    Students must earn a grade of C- or better in all required courses in order for a course to be counted as meeting subject area requirements for most universities/colleges and specifically any Oregon Universities.

    SAT, ACT, and PSAT Testing Accomodations

    Students with documented disabilities, or an Individual Education Program (IEP), or a 504 Plan, who would like to have accommodations for the SAT, ACT or PSAT, are not automatically granted those accommodations. Requests for accommodations typically have a deadline 2 – 3 months before the test is proctored. Approval of accommodations isbased on the impact a disability has on a student’s ability to take a test. Accommodations must be applied for andapproved before the test is given. Additional information about testing accommodations can be found online at www.actstudent.org or www.collegeboard.org or by speaking with your student’s counselor or Case Manager.

    Naviance

    The LO Counseling Department has implemented a web-Based guidance program, Family Connection by Naviance, for students in grades 9-12. Family Connection assists students in exploring colleges and careers, creating resumes, taking personality assessments, managing the college application process, communicating critical deadline, sharing scholarship information and much more!

    All students will be provided an individual registration code from their counselor to access the program and their personal web page. We encourage parents and guests to use this software as well. The program can be accessed via any computer with internet access. The web address is below, the guest password is: lakers https://connection.naviance.com/family-connection/auth/login/?hsid=lohs

    College Bound Student Athletes – NCAA Eligibility Requirements

    The NCAA Eligibility Center verifies the academic and amateur status of all student-athletes who wish to compete in Division I or II athletics. College-bound student-athletes who want to practice, compete and receive athletically related financial aid during their first year at a Division I or II school need to meet the following requirements:

    • Graduate from high school.
    • Complete a minimum of 16 core courses.
    • Earn a minimum required grade-point average in core courses.
    • Earn a qualifying test score on either the ACT or SAT.
    • Request final amateurism certification from the NCAA Eligibility Center.

    For Division I student-athletes who will enroll in August 2017 or later, the requirements to compete in the first year will change. In addition to the above standards, prospects must:

    • Earn at least a 2.3 grade-point average in core courses.
    • Meet an increased sliding-scale standard (for example, an SAT score of 1,000 requires a 2.5 high school core course GPA)
    • Successfully complete 10 of the 16 total required core courses before the start of their senior year in high school. Seven of the 10 courses must bne successfully completed in English, math, and science.

    Prospects that earn at least a 2.0 GPA but not a 2.3 GPA and meet the current sliding scale standard (for example, an SAT score of 1,000 requires a 2.025 high school core course GPA) will be eligible for practice in the first term and athletically related financial aid the entire year, but not competition. Freshmen who are academically successful in the first term will earn the ability to continue to participate. Division III college and universities set their own admission standards. The NCAA does not set initial eligibility requirements in Division III. For more specific information on eligibility, check out the NCAA official website at www.ncaa.org.

    Dual Credit Course Work

    Opportunity to Earn College Credit for High School Course Work. In addition to our Advancemenet Placement (AP) program, we are working with Porland Community College and Clackamas Community College to expand options for our high school students to receive pre-approved college credit for some of the required and elective high school classes currently taught in our school. Students who believe they will receie a letter grade of "A" or "B" in high school courses that are approved for PCC/CCC college credit are encouraged to enroll and receive college credit. These pre-approved college credits apply toward a college degree in the same way that credits taken on a community college campus are accepted by four-year institutions. Dual credit is a benefit to students because they do not have to repeat course work when they enter college and can save a substantial amount of college tuition costs in the process. It has long been recognized that the rigor and academic level of many of the high school classes taught in the district equal or surpass college course work. Students will receive paperwork to apply for college credit from their teacher in each course that qualifies for dual credit.

    Current dual credit courses are as follows: French 3 and 4, Engineering and Design, Oceanography, Spanish 3 and 4, Automotive Fundamentals, General Auto Repair, and Small Engine Repair.

Other Credit Achievement Information

  •  

    Credit for Courses Completed Prior to Ninth Grade

    Students may earn high school credit for accelerated courses taken prior to ninth grade that were equivalent to high school courses in Algebra, Geometry or World Language within the District. A student who passed Algebra or a high math class in junior high will earn Elective units of credit for those classes. These students must still complete three (3) credits of math in high school. A student who passed World Language classes in junior high will earn World Language credit for those classes at LOHS. These courses willnot though count into a student’s high school GPA.

    Students transferring in from junior highs outside the Lake Oswego School District must complete and submita “Pre 9th Grade Verification Form” (available on LOHS Website under Counseling) to have their Math &Language coursework applied to their high school transcript. Only high school equivalent courses will be eligible. The Pre-Ninth Grade Credit Form must be completed, signed and dated by pre-ninth grade teacher and school.

    Credit by Proficiency

    Physical Education

    To provide flexibility in our students’ program of study, LOSD is allowing the second .5 credit in Physical Education to be substituted with proficiency credit through participation in a high school or community school sport. Reminder: The initial required ‘Physical Education’ course must be taken on campus in order for credit to be earned for Required PE.

    To receive secondary .5 proficiency credit, a student must, at the beginning of the season, complete the appropriate paperwork and then participate in an approved high school or community school sponsored sport. Once the sport has been completed and paperwork submitted, Proficiency Credit for P.E. will beadded to the student’s transcript. The student will earn Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory credit based on proficiency credit requirements.

    • Only juniors/seniors who have completed required P.E. may apply for proficiency credit.
    • Seniors are only allowed to earn proficiency credit during first semester and only for the fall or winter sports season.
    • A student is to meet with his/her counselor to discuss the decision to apply for proficiency credit. Students must submit paperwork by third week of first semester for fall or winter sports. Spring sport paperwork must be submitted by third week of second semester.
    • A student is limited to .5 Physical Education Proficiency Credit.
    • Proficiency credit does not count as one of five courses OSAA requires students to be enrolled in to participate in athletics and activities.
    • Proficiency credit does not count as one of five classes a student must pass to participate in an upcoming sport/activity per OSAA guidelines.
    • If a student is cut from a team, he/she will have the option of joining another team or having his/hear application withdrawn without grade penalty.
    • If a student is injured during the season, he/she can request to have his/her application withdrawn without penalty. Each student is responsible for notifying his/her counselor immediately.
    • Paperwork submitted after the end of the semester will not be eligible for a passing grade.
    • Proficiency credit is designed for those students who are unable to fit their second semester of physical education to their schedule. 

     

    Credit by Examination

    World Languages

    Students who have significant experience in a language other than English have graded (A-F) and S/U (satisfactory and unsatisfactory) options for earning credit in World Language.

    Students who wish to receive graded credit may take coursework in a language of their choice. This coursework must be pre-approved, taken through an accredited institution, and an Official Transcript from that accredited institution must be provided. Students will only be approved for off-campus courses that are not offered by the school district.

    Credit-by-examination S/U option is also available in several world languages. Students who choose the credit-by-examination may earn a total of 2.0 credits.

    Student Criteria for Credit-by-Examination

    • Any student who is a native speaker or has had a significant experience in a second language is eligible to take the assessment.
    • Students who pass the assessment will receive S/U credits in World Language, or these S/U credits may be recorded on their transcripts as general Elective credits.
    • Students may not receive World Language credit in a high school course and then receie credit for passing the exam. 
    • Students may take the language assessments for additonal languages to earn general electie credits. However, these additional credits may not supplant other elective course requirements.

    The assessment to be taken is determined by the language the student is seeking to receive credit in. These World Language proficiency credits can be used to meet graduation requirements for the school district. However, not all colleges and universities will accept S/U credits for World Language. It is the responsibility of the students to determine if the credit-by-examination option is appropriate for their post-secondary aspirations. The two assessments are:

    Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency (STAMP) 4S Assessment
    Students who want to receive credit in Arabic, Chinese, French, Japanese, German, and Spanish must take the Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency (STAMP) 4S assessment.

    STAMP 4S Assessment Information

    • The STAMP 4S is a web-based test that assesses language proficiency
    • The STAMP 4S test has four sections – reading, writing, listening, and speaking
    • Test items are based on real-world, every-day situations
    • STAMP 4S measures a test taker's language ability according to Proficiency Stages that are based on national standards
    • Students will earn credit equivalent to the minimum proficiency level achieved in eery category. For example, if a student scores a 3 in reading, a 4 in writing, a 4 in speaking, and a 5 in listening, then the student will earn 3 level 3 score (see Proficiency Stages Equivalency Chart)
    • The parents/guardians are responsible for the assessment fee
    • Students must contact their counseor to set up a time to take the language assessment
    • The STAMP test will be given three times per year. check for specific dates by contacting the Counseling Department 

    STAMP 4S Assessment Opportunities for French, German, Spanish are:
    STAMP 4S Score of 2 is a credit equivalent to 1st year Language STAMP 4S Score of 3 is a credit equivalent to 2nd year Language 
    STAMP 4S Score of 4 is a credit equivalent to 3rd year Language
    STAMP 4S Score of 5 is a credit equivalent to 4th year Language 

    STAMP 4S Assessment Opportunities for Arabic, Chinese, Japanese are:
    STAMP 4S Score of 1 is a credit equivalent to 1st year Language
    STAMP 4S Score of 2 is a credit equivalent to 2nd year Language
    STAMP 4S Score of 3 is a credit equivalent to 3rd year Language
    STAMP 4S Score of 4 is a credit equivalent to 4th year Language

    Note:
    Japanese, Chinese and Arabic do not use the basic Latin alphabet that is shared by English and the Romance languages. Because students studying Japanese, Chinese and Arabic spend a significant portion of their first year and subsequent years learning different alphabets and characters, proficiency develops slower than in French, Spanish and German. It is for this reason that the test scores that a student needs in order to earn credit are lower than with the Romance languages. 

    Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) through BYU
    Students who are interested in earning pass/fail credits in other languages may use the Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) through BYU. 

    FLATS Assessment Information:

    • Foreign Language Achievement Testing Service (FLATS) is available through Brigham Young University (BYU)
    • All language assessments are S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)
    • The assessment is multiple choice and requires a 2 1/2 hour time limit
    • These are achievement assessments, intended to assess whether a student meets beginning level listening comprehension, reading comprehension, and grammatical accuracy at the college level
    • the parents/guardians are responsible for the assessment fee
    • There are 55 different language assessments available. However, students who are interested in Arabic, Chinese, French, Japanese, German, or Spanish credit may only take the STAMP 4S assessment for credit
    • Students must contact their counselors to set up a time to take the language assessment

    FLATS Assessment Language Opportunities:
    Afrikaans, Albanian, Arabic, Armenian, Aymara, Bulgarian, Cakchiquel, Cambodian, Cantonese-Simplified, Cantonese-Traditional, Cebuano, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, ESL, Estonian, Fijian, Finnish, French, Georgian, German, Greek, Guarani, Haitian Creole, Hmong, Hungarian, Icelandic, Ilonggo/Hiligaynon, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latvian, Lithuanian, Malagasy, Malay, Mandarin-Simplified, Mandarin-Traditional, Maori, Mongolian, Navajo, Norwegian, Persian-Farsi, Polish, Portuguese-Brazilian, Portuguese-Continental, Quechua, Rarotongan, Romanian, Russian, Samoan, Serbian, Spanish, Swedish, Tagalog, Tahitian, Thai, Tongan, Ukrainian, Vietnamese, Welsh.

    Credit by Pre-Approval

    Off Campus Credit

    Students may take pre-approved elective courses off campus and apply the credits to their high school transcript. Normally no more than four credits of off-campus experience may be applied and all courses must be pre-approved. The “Off-Campus Credit” paperwork required for pre-approval may be picked up from the counseling office or downloaded from the LOHS Counseling website. If approved, an Official Transcript from the approved institution must be sent to LOHS Counselor upon coursework completion. 

    Credit Make Up

    Credit to make-up courses with failed grades can be earned through summer sessions, recognized correspondence schools, state approved alternative programs, evening high school, college/university, community college, and accredited training institutions, and at LOHS. In the event that the class is not taken at LOHS, students need to arrange for an Official Transcript from the approved institution to be sent to their LOHS Counselor upon coursework completion. 

    Credit to enhance grades must be earned through summer sessions, recognized correspondence schools, state approved alternative programs, evening high school, college/university, community college, and accredited training institutions. Students also need to arrange for an Official Transcript from the approved institution to be sent to their LOHS Counselor upon coursework completion. 

    Make-up credits do not replace grades earned in LOHS classes but are averaged into the student’s GPA. To ensure students are signed up for the correct class, students must complete the “Off-Campus Credit” form prior to enrolling in any off-campus experience. Forms are available on the LOHS Website under Counseling, or in the Counseling office. A list of reputable programs/approved courses is also available within the LOHS website under Counseling. 

Expanded Options Program

  • The Expanded Options Program (Senate Bill 300) provides eligible high school students access to credit for college level coursework funded by the Lake Oswego School District. 

    Eligible students may receive, at no cost, dual college credit and Advanced Placement testing for Advanced Placement courses offered at either district high school. The current dual credit and Advanced Placement courses are noted in the curriculum guide. 

    Eligibility

    The Oregon Department of Education determined that school districts may offer dual college credit courses and Advanced Placement testing, at no cost to students who meet the definitions of ‘at risk’ and ‘otherwise qualified’ as follows: 

    • Qualifies for the free and reduced lunch program; or
    • Qualified through the Lake Oswego School District Fee Waiver/Reduction Program; and/or
    • Has officially dropped out of high school, but would re-enroll in order to participate in this program; and 
    • Is currently enrolled in four or more courses at Lake Oswego High School or Lakeridge High School; and
    • Will be in grade 11 or 12 during the school year in which they enroll in the Expanded Options Program; and
    • Will be 16 years old or older at the time of enrollment in a course under the Expanded Options Program; and
    • Has an educational learning plan on file with the high school; and
    • Has not successfully completed four years of high school; and
    • Is not enrolled in our district high schools as a foreign exchange student; and
    • Meets all of the academic and other requirements of the district to participate in the dual credit classes and/or

    Advanced Placement courses in which they choose to participate.

    There is not a limit to the number of dual credit or Advanced Placement classes an eligible student may take under this program. This program is available for all eligible students for all dual credit or Advanced Placement courses during the period of time they are eligible for the program.

    Additional Information

    This program does not change district policy or graduation requirements. This program offers the opportunity to access the dual college credits offered in our high schools and Advanced Placement testing funded by the school district for eligible students. 

    • As in the past, students who are eligible for the Expanded Options Program as well as students who do not qualify for the program may continue to take college credit course work off campus at their own expense and apply it towards graduation requirements as allowed in the district graduation policy. 
    • As in the past, students who are eligible for the Expanded Options Program as well as students who do not qualify for the program may continue to take college credit course work off campus at their own expense and apply it towards graduation requirements as allowed in the district graduation policy and regulations

    As in the past, students who are not eligible for the Expanded Options Program may continue to participate in dual college credit courses and Advanced Placement Testing at their own expense

    The District reserves the right to approve all courses that are a part of the Expanded Options Program. Students must receive a grade of "B" or better to receive dual credit.

    If you qualify for this program and wish to participate, contact your counselor. 

Courses by Department

  • Business

    The mission of the Business/Marketing Department is to foster student learning through high-quality college-prep and career-oriented curriculum. Daily learning is enhanced by integrating technology, business models, marketing and management concepts pertinent to today’s fast-paced society into the curriculum. 

    Courses have been developed with an emphasis on the applied concepts and skills required for success in a global economy. Students are able to take a variety of classes that cover influential and real-life related business topics. 

    The listed prerequisites are key to helping the students build on their business knowledge gained in each class. Students are encouraged to try classes to help them recognize possible career paths and areas of study in college. Through the business classes students will be exposed to a range of learning strategies such as: creative based projects, guest speakers, field trips, and DECA. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

    Income and Money Management

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None 

    This course is designed to help students develop skills and knowledge necessary to function as intelligent consumers and economic citizens. Specific consumer oriented units include: budgeting, saving, banking, investing, auto insurance, consumer decision-making, and Career planning. Specific introduction to business units include: economics, business in the global economy, social responsibility of business, business ethics, business organization, entrepreneurship, management, human resources, marketing, financial management, production and operations. 

    Marketing 1

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None 

    Marketing 1 prepares students who are planning to study business in college and/or work in the business field after graduation. The course connects real world business with the study of marketing concepts such as: Advertising, promotion, sales, branding and product marketing, distribution, pricing and marketing research. Students will gain a broad perspective of the business world and create authentic print ads, radio ads, sales demonstrations, TV ads and sales manuals by utilizing video production, audio editing, graphic design and word processing. Students will conduct presentations and activities throughout the semester relating to the course curriculum. Marketing 1 is an excellent college preparatory class. 

    Marketing 2: Advertising

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Marketing 1 

    Marketing 2: Advertising is a course designed to further build upon knowledge and skills learned in Marketing 1 with an emphasis on the advertising industry. Students will design a multi-media advertising campaign for a business of their choice. This class will explore both the creative side of advertising and the account management side of advertising. Learning about and using graphic design principles along with effective marketing techniques, students will have the opportunity to construct their own ads and case studies on past advertising campaigns used by various companies and industries (Nike, Adidas, Dove, Apple, McDonald’s, Burger King, Levi’s, Audi, Google and more). The course will also focus on building creativity, applying critical thinking and the psychological influence of advertising. 

    Marketing 2: Sports and Entertainment

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Marketing 1 

    Marketing is a course designed to further build upon knowledge and skills learned in Marketing 1 with an emphasis on direct application to the growing industry of Sports and Entertainment Marketing. Students will make formal presentations on current Sports and Entertainment issues and research, create marketing strategies to promote and sell athletes, teams, products, movies, TV shows, productions and entertainers. Students will also study the evolution of marketing through Social Media and its impact on the Sports and Entertainment industry. Real-world case studies (Nike, Adidas, Under Armour, Collegiate Athletic Programs, Sports Media, Fashion, TV, Radio, Music, Movies) and guest speakers will be incorporated throughout the semester. 

    International Marketing – DECA Experience

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Marketing 1 

    International Marketing is a college preparatory class partnered with DECA, a national association of marketing students. Students will build upon knowledge learned in previous business courses and apply them to independent, student-led business projects. Students will author a DECA marketing project and create a professional business presentation. Project possibilities include: an advertising campaign, a business plan, fashion merchandising promotion plan, international business plan, business community service project, marketing research plan, internet business plan, public relations project, sports marketing plan and others depending on student interest. Class units of study include: management, entrepreneurship, advertising campaigns, travel and tourism marketing, hospitality management marketing, e-commerce, fashion, and retail merchandising. All units of study take a global perspective, and students will have the opportunity to take a career-oriented field trip that incorporates areas of study. To compliment class learning students will meet professionals working in various business career fields. 


    English

    English at Lake Oswego High School is a four-year, primarily college preparatory program which includes both content (literature and language) and performance skills (reading, listening, thinking, writing, and speaking). 

    The English Department strives:

    • to provide expert instruction in a literature based program that integrates the study of vocabulary, punctuation, grammar, sentence structure, and principles of composition; and
    • to create a positive learning environment giving all students opportunities to develop their abilities to read critically and perceptively, to listen with understanding and openness,  to think critically and creatively, to write with clarity and confidence, and to communicate precisely and effectively

    Appropriate adaptations to the regular program are made for students who are on IEPs, who qualify for 504 plans, or who need additional help in English. 

    Honors classes are offered at each level for students who have an extensive interest in English and who meet established English Department criteria as determined by application. The junior and senior level courses also comprise AP Language and AP Literature courses respectively. Elective classes provide additional opportunities for students with specialized interests or needs. 

    Core Courses: Advanced Communication Skills, Freshman English, Sophomore English, Junior English, Senior English

    Application Courses: Freshman Honors English and Sophomore Honors English

    Recommendation Courses: ELD Literature and Composition* English Connections, English Language Department*

    Electives: Broadcast Journalism, Creative Writing, Journalism, Literature through Film Studies, Power Reading, Newspaper, Yearbook

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change

    *Placement assigned by ELL Specialist

    Advanced Communications Skills

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grade: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This required course provides students with instruction in advanced reading and speaking skills. The course is designed to help students meet the state standards necessary for achieving academic certification. Students will learn to construct meaning in oral and written text, using a variety of processes. 

    In this course students will: 

    • determine stated and implied meaning in printed material and oral presentations 
    • analyze and evaluate ideas and information in oral and written communications 
    • communicate using stylistic devices appropriate to audience and purpose 
    • apply strategies to monitor their understanding 

    Freshman English

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    The freshman curriculum teaches the skills of writing, speaking, language use, and vocabulary development through the study of literature. Core readings include Romeo and Juliet and To Kill a Mockingbird, along with short stories, poetry, nonfiction, and novels from the extended reading list. The targeted modes of writing are descriptive, expository, and narrative. 

    Sophomore English

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    The sophomore curriculum builds on the student’s background in writing, reading, speaking, and comprehending. Core readings include a study of the heroic quest and narrative patterns in Greek mythology, Biblical literature, Arthurian legends and Steinbeck’s classic Of Mice and Men along with teacher choices from an extended list of titles. Poetry, spelling, grammar, and vocabulary acquisition are integrated into individual literary units. Targeted writing modes are expository, narrative, and persuasive. Introduction of academic writing and documented research will require the use of technology. 

    Junior English

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 11-12
    Prerequisite: None

    In the junior curriculum the student examines the American experience from a range of voices. Core readings include Into the Wild, The Crucible, and The Great Gatsby along with short story, poetry, drama, and nonfiction selections from an extended list of titles. Language study, including vocabulary, is an integral part of the student’s reading experiences. Grammar, spelling, usage, and punctuation skills are developed through ongoing composition work, Targeted writing modes are narrative and expository as well as a major literary research paper. 

    Senior English

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 12
    Prerequisite: None

    Senior English asks students to examine some of humankind’s most difficult and persistent questions by comparing romantic, tragic, satiric, and comic views of human nature. Core readings include Siddhartha, Hamlet, a dystopia (Anthem, Brave New World, A Canticle for Leibowitz, Herland, 1984, or We), along with teacher choices from an extended list of titles. Individual and group language study, including vocabulary, is ongoing. Targeted writing modes are literary analysis, forms of academic writing, and development of the application essay. 

    Honors English

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 9-10
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    Placement in Honors classes at all levels is determined each year through an application process. Students who demonstrate a genuine interest in literature, who write with notable proficiency, clarity, and fluency, are encouraged to apply. Application packets, including a listing of behaviors characteristic of a successful Honors English student and an explanation of the selection process, are available in the Counseling Office and in the English Department. 

    Freshman Honors English 

    Freshman Honors English is an intellectually challenging course for students who have a genuine interest in literature and in writing as demonstrated by a high level of performance. Students are asked to read perceptively and extensively, to write with proficiency and to display a wide range of thinking abilities. In addition to the core curriculum, students are asked to read and analyze seven books throughout the year. Poetry, grammar, usage, and vocabulary are also integrated into the curriculum. Students are required to participate in class discussions by offering insightful literary interpretations, thereby contributing to the overall quality of the classroom experience. 

    Sophomore Honors English 

    Sophomore Honors English instruction focuses on our cultural heritage and seeks to acquaint students with a sampling of literature from the great reservoir of Western thought which continues to shape our literature, identity, and experience. In examining the ethical choices people make within the context of the developing Western culture, students study literature from the Greeks, the Bible, Arthurian legends, Shakespearean tragedy, Thomas Hardy, and Charles Dickens. In addition, modern works, which are related to the classics by allusions, archetypal patterns, images, and themes, are read and analyzed. Emphasis is placed upon changes in language and style as well as on changes in cultural values. 

    AP English

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 11-12

    Applications for placement in Honors/AP English, including an on-demand essay, are accepted each year in April and in August for transfer students. Students whose applications demonstrate they meet the criteria outlined in the application packet will be placed in the class. If committee review of a student's application determines the appropriate placement to be regular English, the student is given one additional option. After weighing the committee recommendation, the student and his/her parents may decide that the student will attempt the challenge and enroll in the AP/Honors class. However, all course standards and expectations will remain the same. 

    AP English Language and Composition G11-12

    Junior AP English challenges talented, motivated students who excel in English to examine complex material, in depth, through critical discussion and writing. The course includes extensive independent reading and focuses on inquiry, using inductive, seminar-type strategies which depend upon student interaction and willingness to take intellectual risks. Students are expected to discuss in detail, to elaborate, to ask intriguing questions, to construct abstractions, to draw inferences, and to make insightful connections in their study of American literature and language. This course prepares students to take the AP Language and Composition exam. 

    AP English Literature and Composition G12

    Senior AP English emphasizes literary criticism, consonant with the approach of the College Board's Advanced Placement guidelines. Challenging works of classic and contemporary literature are examined in depth using a variety of critical approaches, including traditional, moral and philosophical, mythic and archetypal, psychological, political and sociological, historical, formalist, and other viewpoints. Assessment is based on a wide variety of writing experiences with an emphasis on literary analysis. College credit can be earned through the College Board Advanced Placement Test in English Literature and Composition. 

    ELD Literature and Composition

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Testing and Recommendation of Instructor

    ELD Literature is designed for non-native English speakers of limited English proficiency. Genres include short stories, essays, poetry, folk tales, myths, biographies and novels. Students become familiar with literary terminology such as imagery, mood, analogy, point of view, setting personification, foreshadowing and conflict. Assignments focus on vocabulary, comprehension, interpretation and composition skills. This course is aligned with the Oregon State Standards for Language Arts. 

    English Connections 

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of current English Teacher

    The semester course would be designed around identifying students early in the year who are struggling in their core English class and placing them in this class to help with essential skills. The course would be taught by members of the English department and would work primarily to help students be successful in their core English class.

    Rather than giving students more homework or additional work, this course would be primarily meant for students to have more one-on-one help from an English teacher to build essential skills and help them with comprehension of materials in their regular English class. Students and the instructor could create specific, individualize plans centered on each student’s needs such as reading comprehension skills, writing skills, verbal listening skills, study skills, and other related topics, necessary for the success of all students in English classes at LOHS. 

    English Language Development

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Testing and Recommendation of Instructor

    English Language Development is designed for non-native English speakers who are beginning to learn or have been learning English for a short time. Specifically, students will be able to: listen and understand, read with comprehension, communicate verbally with good pronunciation and communicate in writing. Additionally, students will demonstrate awareness of intercultural similarities and differences, and be aware of career applications of English language study. 

     

    English Electives

    Broadcast Journalism

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None, but it is preferred to have a semester of Journalism before taking this course

    This class will expose students to broadcast and radio journalism and will be the foundation of our broadcast program. Students will learn how to write a news program, how to act in front of a camera, report from a variety of locations, create videos, edit, and produce both long and short programs. They 

    will create podcasts and learn the differences between Radio and TV broadcasting. They would also be in charge of filming, producing, and distributing Laker Broadcasting events and Lake News to the student body and community. This course will prepare them for a possible career in Broadcast Journalism while addressing how the field is changing in the 21st century. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Creative Writing

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    The purpose of the Creative Writing course is to expand the student’s ability to write creatively and confidently. Students will write frequently on a variety of topics and in various forms, all geared toward developing personal voice and style. 

    Journalism

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Journalism class focuses on developing better communication skills by giving students the opportunity to design, write and publish their own publication, which is distributed to the entire student body. Throughout the course, students learn how to gather information, interview, and report facts in standard journalistic forms: news, feature, editorial, and review writing. Students also study the history of journalism, page design, and recent technological advances in the field of journalism. Creativity in writing, working with Microsoft Word and InDesign, and design of newspapers and magazines are essential parts of the learning experience. 

    Literature through Film Studies

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Working across cultures, Film Studies investigates the main genres of film, looking at each within different cultures and time periods. An examination of the evolution of film is a significant piece of the curriculum. Students understand the importance of context and audience when studying films by viewing from artistic, cultural and historical perspectives. Students’ abilities to apply these concepts and to make connections are essential for understanding the course content. 

    Power Reading

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Power Reading provides students with the opportunity to engage with fiction and nonfiction on a daily basis so that they may explore how literature, in all its varied forms, can inform their understanding of themselves and the human condition. Students primarily will read novels of their own choosing and will work independently and in literature circles. Students will also receive instruction and guided practice to better prepare them for the SAT in critical reading, writing, and vocabulary development. Due to the more independent and individualized nature of the course, students of various reading levels will be supported as they seek to improve their ability to comprehend, analyze and interpret texts and use language in complex and meaningful ways. 

    Newspaper

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Journalism and Selection by Application

    Newspaper class is built around the publication of Lake Views, the student publication that is distributed once a month. Newspaper class provides students with the opportunity to experience higher order writing and critical thinking skills, as they are expected to master all the journalistic modes: news, feature, editorial, and sports writing. In addition, students are expected to design and produce the school paper on InDesign. Valuable leadership skills are also developed in this course. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Yearbook

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    Yearbook class is designed to characterize a school year through production of the Lake Oswego High School yearbook, the Laker Log. The class stresses two important objectives: 

    • to capture in a lively, fresh, unique manner the essence of the Laker experience as it evolves during the year, and 
    • to portray the key events in the life of our school and the individuals who will shape our memories of that year. 

    Yearbook staffers, working with Studioworks and led by editors-in-chief and section editors, are responsible for all stages of production—including photography, layout, and page design, interviewing and note-taking, headline, caption, copywriting, and final proofing. Editors attend Yearbook Camp in August to plan for the year and meet regularly with a yearbook publication representative throughout the year to coordinate overall production. A student business team contacts local businesses and parents to produce the advertisements and personal senior messages that help defray the cost of the publication. Course may be repeated for credit.


    Family and Consumer Studies

    Family and Consumer Studies courses prepare students for the future by providing opportunities to develop the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors needed for: 

    • Maximizing relationships within the family setting. 
    • Balancing personal, home, family and work lives. 
    • Promoting optimal nutrition and wellness. 
    • Successful life management. 
    • Managing resources and functioning effectively as consumers. 

    NOTE: Students with severe food allergies should consider choosing these courses carefully. Extensive baking is done in both classes and can be problematic for those with food allergies. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

    Foods and Nutrition

    One semester
    Credit:  .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Foods and Nutrition is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the fundamentals of food preparation. Through lecture, hands-on work and projects, instruction is devoted to concepts and skills in nutrition, kitchen and food safety, and meal management. Emphasis is placed on the preparation of healthy foods that meet individual and family needs while equipping students with the skills needed for a lifetime of food preparation. Students have the opportunity to prepare a variety of foods from “scratch” while working in cooperative groups. 

    Advanced Foods and Nutrition

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Foods and Nutrition

    Advanced Foods and Nutrition build on the skills students develop in the introductory class. In addition to advanced techniques in nutrition and wellness, food science, and food safety and sanitation, there will be special emphasis on the preparation of main dishes and accompaniments. A study of regional and international cuisines is included. Students will plan menus, prepare complete meals, and have numerous opportunities to demonstrate their creativity. Once again, students work in a laboratory setting in cooperative groups. 


     Fine Arts – Performing

    Performing Arts courses are a pathway to understanding the self, society, culture, and history. Performing Arts use a universal language that connects all people across space and time. In Music and Drama, students create, describe and analyze their performance. The Performing Arts courses offered at LOHS range from beginning to continuing to advanced levels and may require prerequisites for enrollment. 

    • Beginning level courses
      Acting 1
    • Laker Choir (Males)
    • Treble Choir (Females) 

    Continuing level courses
    Acting 2,

    • A Cappella (Choir)
    • Bel Canto Choir
    • Chamber Ensemble
    • Concert Band
    • String Orchestra
    • Musical Theater Workshop
    • Performance Seminar
    • Symphonic Band

    Advanced level courses

    • Acting 3
    • Advanced Musical Theater Workshop
    • Jazz Band
    • Windjammers (Choir)
    • Wind Ensemble (Band) 
    • AP Music Theory 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change 

    A Cappella

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Audition and Recommendation of Instructor

    This advanced choral group is open by audition to students in grades 11 through 12. The choir will perform choral music of all styles and periods. Basics in breath support and general tone production will be reviewed, with emphasis placed on refining the vocal sound and professionalism in a choral performance setting. A Cappella choir will participate in all LOHS choir concerts and in the Three Rivers League Festival each April. This group will participate in the State Choral Championships in May if they qualify. Performance tours to other locales may occur. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Acting 1

    One semester
    Credit: .
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This is the gateway class for all other classes offered in the Drama Department. It is a great way to interact with a wide range of students. Acting I introduces the student to basic acting through character analysis, script analysis and improvisation. We also explore theater history and what it means to a modern-day actor. This course is recommended for all students. 

    Acting 2

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Acting 1

    Acting 2 explores the art of the actor through scene study. Students will work on two-person scenes, monologues, and scenes created through the use of theater games and improvisation. This is a great class for honing performance. 

    Acting 3

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Acting 2

    This course is designed to introduce the art of the director to advanced drama students. Students will read and analyze a script in a group setting and then direct fellow students in two-person scenes. This class will also explore audition techniques for college programs and professional work in the field of acting and introduce the skill of stage combat. Class may be repeated for credit. 

    AP Music Theory

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    AP Music Theory is a college-level course that explores the fundamental structure and function of music. Through aural and written analysis, students will learn advanced musical skills such as harmonic analysis, composition, melodic and harmonic dictation, and sight-singing. Topics covered include key signatures, triads, intervals, rhythms, melodic structure, harmonic chord progression, texture, form, ear training, written analysis, and some music history and style. The AP Music Theory course requires prior music experience and additional summer work. The AP Music Theory exam will be offered in May. 

    Bel Canto Choir

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12 Female
    Prerequisite: Audition and Recommendation of Instructor

    This choral group is open by audition to girls in grades 10-12 who are serious about music and want to enjoy the experience of singing and performing with a select all-girls group. A wide range of choral literature will be studied and performed. Emphasis will be placed on the continued development of singing skills and musicianship as well as stage presence and professionalism. 

    This choir will perform in all LOHS choir concerts and throughout the metro area during the year. Bel Canto Choir may also participate in Choral Festivals/Contests as available. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Concert Band

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Prior playing experience or approval of director

    The Concert Band is designed for students with 2-3 years of instrumental music instruction at the junior high level. The curriculum of the Concert Band is designed to complete and refine the fundamental instrumental and musical skills introduced in the junior high band program and prepare students for the more advanced music they will be encountering in high school. The Concert Band performs on all school concerts and select festivals throughout the year. All students in the Concert Band also participate in the Pep Band. 

    Jazz Band

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful audition with instructor and concurrent enrollment in a band, orchestra, or choir class

    The Jazz Band is dedicated to the study of various musical styles in the jazz and popular tradition (swing, Latin, funk, rock, ballad, etc.) Included in the Jazz Band course is an extended study of improvisation. Participation in the Jazz Band is open to all students enrolled in a band, orchestra, or choir class and requires a successful audition with the band director. Instrumentation is limited to the traditional big band set-up, with occasional adjustments as needed. 

    Laker Choir

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12 Male
    Prerequisite: None

    Laker Choir is a non-auditioned group for boys in grades 9-12. This course emphasizes development of vocal skills, sight singing, musicianship, performance and the fun of singing in an ensemble. This group will perform in all LOHS choir concerts. Students may repeat this course for credit. 

    Musical Theater Workshop

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Acting 1

    A class devised for students whose interest in the theatrical arts tends to be towards that truly American contribution to the world theater – The Musical. This class will study musical theater by creating, casting and performing a Broadway Review. The focus of this class is on singing and dancing and working together in a large group. 

    Performance Seminar

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Acting 1

    This course is designed to focus the students’ acting skills through in-depth study of a single script. In past years this class has used Shakespeare and the ancient Greeks as source material. This class has also used contemporary plays as well. The student will participate in casting, rehearsing, building and acting in a workshop performance of major play. Teamwork is the soul of the class. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Philharmonic Orchestra

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    The orchestra curriculum will be composed of the following components: tone production, rhythm, finger patterns, bowing patterns, articulation, scales, ear training, music reading, vocabulary, music theory, and music history. This class will emphasize these basic musicianship and performance skills through a study of specific orchestral literature that leads to the understanding and appreciation of music, as well as the development of performance skills. After-school attendance of rehearsals and performances is required. 

    Symphonic Band

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Concert Band or approval of director

    The Symphonic Band is open to students who have completed 1 year (2 semesters) of study in the Concert Band or at the discretion of the band director. This course continues the development of musical skills and concepts introduced in the Concert Band through the rehearsal and performance of more advanced and sophisticated literature. The Symphonic Band performs on all school concerts and select festivals throughout the school year. Students in the Symphonic Band also participate in the Pep Band. 

    Symphony Orchestra

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Audition (1-year Philharmonic Orchestra recommended)

    Students will demonstrate knowledge of advanced playing positions (half through fifth) on their instrument of violin, viola, cello, or bass, as well as an understanding of advanced concepts of bowing styles, rhythm, and left/right-hand technique. Students should exhibit a characteristic sound on their instrument. This course will focus on the above as well as smaller ensemble settings using the literature of string quartets and quintets. Students will learn to: demonstrate independent artistic judgment in self-evaluation; compare musical genres or styles; compare the uses of characteristic elements, artistic processes, and organizational principles amongst music and art forms in different historical periods and cultures. After-school attendance of rehearsals and performances is required. 

    Treble Choir

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9 Female
    Prerequisite: None

    Treble Choir is a non-auditioned group for freshmen girls. This course emphasizes development of core skills, sight singing, musicianship, performance and the fun of singing in an ensemble. This group will perform in all LOHS choir concerts and may join forces with the Laker Choir for concerts. 

    Wind Ensemble

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful audition with instructor

    The Wind Ensemble is the highest level band at LOHS. Membership is by audition only and requires the approval of the band director. The Wind Ensemble is dedicated to the study and performance of advanced concert band literature. Members are held to a high standard of rehearsal preparation, musical sophistication and performance quality. The Wind Ensemble performs at all school concerts and select festivals throughout the school year. As the varsity ensemble, the Wind Ensemble also represents LOHS in Three Rivers League and OSAA adjudicated contests. Members of the Wind Ensemble will also complete an extensive study in chamber music and participate in the pep band. 

    Windjammers

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Audition and recommendation of instructor, Dual enrollment in A Cappella

    This choir is a select vocal ensemble. The choir will perform extensively throughout the year in the metro area as well as in all LOHS choir concerts. They will also present an annual Variety Show. A great deal of emphasis will be placed on professionalism and esprit de corps. Auditions for the group are held in the spring. All Windjammers are required to dual enroll in A Cappella as they will perform with that group at concerts. Course may be repeated for credit. 


     Fine Arts – Visual

    Fine Arts courses are a pathway to understanding the self, society, culture, and history. Fine Arts use a universal language that connects all people across space and time. Students understand how works of art relate to the time period and cultures in which they were created. By participating in art classes, students will gain a deeper appreciation of the aesthetic qualities in all of the arts. 

    Students in visual arts respond to, understand, create and analyze visual images. The fine arts courses offered at LOHS range from beginning to intermediate to advanced levels and may require prerequisites for enrollment. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

     

    Art 1

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    The elements and principles of design are explored as a form of communication and expression. Students will apply design ideas while creating original artwork. The emphasis will be on line, form, space, shape, texture and color, their variations and how they relate. Students will also learn to think about the visual arts from a combined personal, historical and cultural point of view. This course is a prerequisite for all other art classes. 

    Art 2

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Art 1

    Art 2 explores a variety of basic techniques and materials with emphasis on individual expression. Students will explore historic and contemporary models of drawing and painting. By creating original artwork they will build upon the design ideas introduced in Art 1. 

    Art 3

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades 10-12
    Prerequisite: Art 1 and 2

    Art 3 offers students the opportunity to build on techniques learned in introductory art classes. A variety of media will be used to explore advanced techniques and develop individual portfolios. This class is recommended for students who are serious about pursuing a career in art after high school as well as students who enjoy drawing and wish to develop their techniques and ideas. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    AP Studio Art/2-D Design

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Art 1, 2, and 3; or Photography 1 and 2; plus Completed Application (two completed semesters of Art 3 preferred.)

    AP Studio Art is designed to allow the experienced and serious art student to investigate specific areas of art in depth. AP Studio Art is an academically rigorous class. Students will choose from a variety of art areas from self-directed and designed art experiences. Students who elect to take this course should be self-motivated and self-directed as well as cooperative, responsible art students. This course is especially directed toward those preparing art portfolios for college entrance. Critiques, written analyses, blogging, artist statements, out of class assignments and completion of the AP portfolio will be required. Students are asked to attend a retreat and take the AP test. There is a fee for materials the student takes home. The course may be repeated for credit. 

    Ceramics 1: Beginning

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Ceramics blends design ideas and studio experience in clay to provide an introductory experience in the Visual Arts. Elements and principles of design are emphasized as foundational ideas in ceramic media. Students will learn how to create, critique, evaluate, and appreciate works of art through beginning hand building techniques such as pinch, coil, slab and mould work; introductory forms on the potter’s wheel; and exploration of decorative techniques. This course is required for Advanced Ceramics. There is a fee for materials the student takes home. 

    Ceramics 2: Advanced

    One semester
    Credit: .
    Grades 9-12
    Prerequisite: Ceramics 1: Beginning

    Ceramics 2 Advanced Ceramics expands on the ideas and skills gained in Beginning Ceramics. As in other art courses, studio work will develop and reinforce student understandings of the elements and principles of art, which is an integral part of a strong portfolio. Students are encouraged to develop creative thinking and personal expression as well as skills, techniques and understanding needed to create quality work. Students will explore and expand on a variety of ceramic techniques, including more complex hand-building, sculptural ceramics, and a variety of wheel-throwing. Additionally, students are encouraged to explore a variety of alternative firing techniques such as Raku, Salt/ Soda firing, wood firing, and pit firing. Student’s interest in the subject strongly influences the curriculum. There is a fee for materials the student takes home. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Ceramics 3: Sculpture

    One semester
    Credit: .
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Ceramics 1 and 2

    Sculpture is a studio experience designed to broaden the student’s concept of art media and creativity. Sculpture is recommended for the art student who intends on applying for the AP-3D studio art class and/ or is serious about pursuing art in college and beyond. A wide range of less familiar materials and techniques will be explored and utilized in the sculpture processes to encourage creative problem solving. Media will include clay/ceramics, wood, metal, plaster, foam and mold making. Emphasis is placed on individual idea development and inventive use of media. As in other art courses, studio work will develop and reinforce student understandings of the elements and principles of art and design, which is an integral part of a strong portfolio. There is an emphasis on developing creative thinking and personal expression as well as skills, techniques and understanding needed to create quality work. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    AP Studio Art/3-D Design

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Ceramics 1, 2, and 3 plus Completed Application

    AP 3-D Design is designed to allow the experienced art student to investigate specific areas of three dimensional form in depth. Students will choose from a variety of art areas from self-directed and designed art experiences. Students who elect to take this course must be self-motivated and self-directed as well as cooperative, responsible art students. This course is especially directed toward those preparing art portfolios for college entrance. Written analyses, sketchbooks, a written artist statement, out-of-class work, and an artist’s portfolio will be required. Ongoing critiques and self-evaluations will be an integral part of this class. There is a fee for materials the student takes home. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Photography 1

    One semester
    Credit: .
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None but Art 1 encouraged

    Photography 1 is a semester class that focuses on understanding the basic operations and functions of a DSLR camera and the manipulation of its settings to achieve high-quality photographic images. Furthermore, we will explore the idea of composition using elements of art and principles of design, lighting, and creative manipulation using editing software. Students of all ability and experience levels are welcome. We will study the history of photography, practice art criticism, and explore the connection between photography and storytelling in our modern world. Students will also learn how to organize and optimize their photographs for print and online purposes, including how to prepare their work for exhibition and/or sale. This class encourages student initiative, cooperation, and creativity, as well as independence, motivation, and responsibility. After the completion of Photography 1, students can continue developing their photographic knowledge, experience, and portfolio in Photography 2. 

    Photography 2

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades 11-12
    Prerequisite: Photography 1 and Art 1 encouraged

    Photography 2 is a semester class for students who have already taken Photography 1 and want to further develop their photographic skills in effective and high-quality image making. Using DSLR cameras, students will explore technical, artistic, and commercial aspects of photography. More specifically, we will delve into the technical workings of camera operation, use a range of lenses, utilize dynamic composition and experimental lighting, and further familiarize ourselves with editing software for creative manipulation. We will also have the opportunity to investigate and glean inspiration from artists in the photographic world. This class encourages student initiative, cooperation, and creativity, as well as independence, motivation, and responsibility. Students will prepare a portfolio of work to exhibit at the completion of the course. After the completion of Photography 2, students can complete application for AP Studio Art 2-D Design. 


    Health

    The Health Education program goal is to promote healthful living and discourage health-risk behaviors. Health Education can help ensure that students are fit, healthy, and ready to learn every day. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

     

    Lifetime Health

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    The general objectives of this course are to provide the learner with: 

    1. A model for establishing and/or modifying health behaviors. 
    2. Knowledge of eating disorders, depression, and suicide. 
    3. Knowledge of nutrition concepts and practice in food selection. 
    4. An understanding of infectious and chronic diseases which are common to modern life and how certain diseases can be influenced by lifestyle choices. 
    5. Knowledge of personal health issues associated with reproduction and the reproductive system. 
    6. Knowledge of risks and effects of substance abuse on various aspects of one's life and/or body. 

    Health Issues

    One semester
    Credit: .
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This course focuses on the study of responsible decision-making as it pertains to a variety of issues impacting the health of the American family. This course includes how to build successful relationships through effective communication skills, conflict resolution techniques and the sharing of feelings. Other areas of focus include drug-alcohol related decision making and consumer awareness. 


    Leadership

    Involving fellow Lakers in collaborative experiences, teamwork and networking, as positive role models or mentors, around stated purposes and goals, is the core of LOHS Leadership. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

     

    Leadership

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Election to Student Government

    Working with administration, staff and students, student leaders play an important role in setting the tone for the school year. Successful implementation of student-sponsored activities is an essential component of creating a positive school environment. This course is designed to provide elected student leaders with structured guidance in carrying out the responsibilities of their positions and developing their own leadership style. Starting with the skills of goal setting, task analysis and time management, students plan, organize, and evaluate school activities. The Leadership course aids students in developing positive communication, decision-making, problem-solving, and self-evaluation skills. This course is required of all student body and class officers. Course may be repeated for credit.  

    Link Crew Leadership (Laker Crew)

    One semester
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12

    Link Crew is a freshman transition program that welcomes freshmen and makes them feel comfortable throughout the first year of their high school experience. Link Crew is built on the belief that students can help students succeed. In this course, sophomores, juniors and seniors are trained to be Link Crew Leaders. Link Crew Leaders are taught the skills and given the experience to be positive role models in order to guide freshmen and new students through a successful first year at LOHS. 


    Mathematics

    Mathematics provides a foundation for the learning of science and technology as well as for the interpretation of quantitative information in other subjects. The following is the sequence of Mathematics courses at LOHS:

    Algebra 
    Geometry or Integrated Alg/Geometry 
    Advanced Algebra A or Advanced Algebra 
    Pre-Calculus or Discrete Math 
    AP Calculus AB or AP Statistics 
    AP Calculus BC 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

    NOTE: 

    • A graphing calculator ((TI-83 Series, TI-84 Series, TI-89 and TI-Nspire) is required for Advanced Algebra and beyond. It is also recommended for Algebra and Geometry
    • Discrete Math can be taken any time after Advanced Algebra and can be taken concurrently with either Pre-Calculus or AP Calculus AB/BC 
    • AP Statistics and AP Calculus can be taken concurrently if Senior
    • Math Connections is an elective credit class that supports students in their regular math class
    • Placement recommendations are made by the student’s current math teacher for the following year 

     

    Algebra

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of eighth grade curriculum

    This course continues the study of patterns and functions from Pre-Algebra while introducing the language and basic properties of Algebra. Students will explore linear, quadratic, polynomial, and exponential functions and will be expected to solve equations and systems of linear equations through a variety of techniques including using the quadratic formula and factoring. Connections between graphical, numerical, and symbolic representations of functions will be emphasized to build a conceptual understanding of Algebra.

    Integrated Algebra/Geometry

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra and recommendation of current Math instructor

    This course is intended for the student who has passed an Algebra course, but needs to build up Algebra skills before continuing with Geometry. The course includes the study of Algebra and Geometry topics with probability and statistics. Graphical, numerical and symbolic representations of real-life applications will be used to build a conceptual understanding. Students will be introduced to graphing calculators. 

    Geometry

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Completion of Algebra or Integrated Algebra/Geometry and recommendation of current Math instructor

    This course includes the use of geometric patterns and relationships to classify figures and the application of properties of geometric figures to solve problems. Students will determine properties of geometric figures and prove relationships between them using given information. Students will make and use two- and three-dimensional drawings and will be able to analyze and interpret graphs. Algebraic and geometric concepts will be interrelated. Students will be required to use a scientific calculator. The course begins to develop the critical thinking needed for Calculus and Statistics, and introduces forms of logical arguments. 

    Advanced Algebra A

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra and Geometry and recommendation of current Math instructor

    This course is an extension and application of the concepts and skills developed in Algebra and Geometry. The concept of function is emphasized. Topics to be covered include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial and trigonometric functions. Students will be expected to use a graphing calculator for data analysis. Graphical, numerical, and symbolic representations of real-life applications will be used to build a conceptual understanding of the functions studied in this course. Composition, inverses, and transformations of functions will be thoroughly explored. (Note: After successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to take Discrete Math, AP Statistics, or Pre-Calculus. It is necessary to complete Pre-Calculus before taking AP Calculus.) 

    Advanced Algebra

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry or Integrated Algebra/geometry and recommendation of current Math instructor

    This course is for students NOT planning on taking Pre-Calculus and subsequent AP math courses. This course is an extension and application of the concepts and skills developed in Algebra and Geometry. The concept of function is emphasized. Topics to be covered include linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic and polynomial functions. Students will be expected to use a graphing calculator for data analysis. Graphical, numerical and symbolic representations of real-life applications will be used to build a conceptual understanding of the functions studied in this course. Composition, inverses, and transformations of functions will be thoroughly explored. 

    Discrete Mathematics

    One year
    Credit: 
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra

    Most of the mathematical applications in the social sciences and in the design of efficient computer systems involve discrete mathematics rather than Calculus which is more applicable in science and engineering. An understanding of many important problems in discrete mathematics requires less background than topics studied in Calculus. This course provides a sound introduction to management science, linear programming, statistics and probability, the digital revolution, social choice and decision making (voting systems, fair division, game theory), symmetry and patterns, similarity, growth relative to dimensions, recursion, and math modeling. 

    AP Statistics

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra and recommendation of current Math instructor

    Advanced Placement Statistics will introduce students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. It will emphasize innovative statistical thinking rather than routine procedures. This course is intended to be equivalent to an introductory non-calculus based college course in statistics. Students will do a significant amount of reading, computer work and independent projects. 

    Pre-Calculus

    One year
    Credit: 
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra A and recommendation of current Math instructor

    This course will provide the background needed to succeed in AP Calculus. The fundamentals of functions will be emphasized through the study of polynomial, rational, Power, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and circular functions. Using functions as mathematical models for real-life situations will be emphasized. Connections between the graphical, numerical, and symbolic representations of functions will be used to build conceptual understanding. Students will study complex and polar coordinates, and parametric representations of functions. A conceptual understanding of limit will be developed. Students will study patterns in arithmetic and geometric sequences. 

    AP Calculus AB

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus and recommendation of current Math instructor

    This is an advanced placement course in analytical geometry and differential and integral calculus. The function concept is central to Calculus and will be studied graphically and numerically, as well as symbolically. Technology will be used extensively with this multiple representation approach to functions to build a conceptual understanding of limits and continuity, differentiation, integration and differential equations. College credit can be earned by scoring appropriately on the College Board Advanced Placement Test in Mathematics, which is given in May of each year. 

    AP Calculus BC

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: C or better in AP Calculus and recommendation of AP Calculus instructor

    This is a college level course, which studies Calculus concepts graphically, theoretically, numerically and symbolically. It will review AP Calculus material, parametric equations, polar coordinates, vectors and the geometry of space, vector-valued functions, multi-variable functions, multiple integration, vector analysis, linear algebra and differential equations. Students completing this course may receive college credit by scoring appropriately on the AP Calculus BC exam in May. This course will challenge and extend student knowledge in theoretical and applied mathematics. Technology will be extensively used. 

    Calculus 3

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grade: 12
    Prerequisite: C or better in AP Calculus and recommendation of AP Calculus instructor

    Calculus 3 is a college-level course that extends the concepts developed in Calculus AB and BC into the areas of vector-valued functions, multivariable functions, and second-order differential equations. Technology will be used to explore 3-D graphing. 

    Math Connections

    One year
    Credit: 
    Available for Geometry, Integrated Algebra and Advanced Algebra
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of current math instructor

    Math Connections is a class designed to support students in their primary math class. Students will practice basic skills necessary to be successful in all of the core math classes offered. These basic skills include, but are not limited to, operations on integers and fractions, order of operations, simplifying algebraic expressions, solving algebraic equations, solving systems of equations, solving inequalities, and graphing functions. In addition to practicing basic skills, time will be taken to explore how those concepts relate to and are used in the real-world. Time will also be provided for students to work on and receive help with material from their primary math class. Beyond the mathematical concepts studied, students will also learn strategies to be more effective students and better test takers. Course earns elective credit and maybe repeated. 

    Strategic Math

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of current Math instructor

    Strategic Math is a math intervention program designed to raise math achievement for students who are also enrolled in Algebra. This class helps to strengthen foundational skills while supporting the students with new content that is delivered in their Algebra course through a combination of whole-group activities, small-group instruction, and independent learning. Credit for this class applies to a modified diploma or can be used as an elective credit for a regular diploma. Course may be repeated for elective credit.


    Physical Education

    The Physical Education program goal is the development of a physically-educated person one who knows the benefits from involvement in physical activity, values physical activity and its contributions to a healthy lifestyle and who has learned skills necessary to perform a variety of physical activities, is physically fit, and participates regularly in physical activity. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

     

    Physical Education (Required)

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9 or 10
    Prerequisite: None

    This is a course designed to develop physical fitness, poise and coordination through large group activities. Some individual sports will be introduced. Basic skills and knowledge are offered in various sports and physical activities. P.E. requirement is to be completed in 9th or 10th grade. 

    Aerobics: Strength and Fitness

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Physical Education

    This course combines cardiovascular, stretching and strength training exercises to increase flexibility and tone all muscles. Students will focus on using lighter weight, resistance bands, body weight and other types of equipment outside the weight room. This class will also introduce a variety of different yoga sequences and poses. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Lifetime Sports and Fitness

    One semester
    Credit: .
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Physical Education

    The emphasis in this course is on fitness and various individual and team sports that a person may participate in throughout life. Each student will have the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of individual and group activities. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Mindfulness and Yoga

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This course will focus on developing skills in mindfulness and yoga. Mindfulness can be described as conscious awareness for the present moment. Students will learn stress reduction techniques and study ways to live a more focused and balanced life. Half of each class will be spent receiving instruction on Yoga and how to use breathing to slow their heart rate and bring themselves to a place of balance. 

    Weight Training

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Emphasis of this class is on a self-designed program of weight lifting. The approach in the class is to have all students do overall conditioning, which is then complemented by their own particular needs. The class period consists of warm-up activities and general weight lifting, followed by individual conditioning. Course may be repeated for credit.


    Science

    Science Department course offerings give students the opportunity to learn more about the world around them and their interaction with it. Students experience a wide range of content as well as demonstrate capacity for observation, synthesis and analysis of ideas, use of equipment, and effective communication. 

    The most common four-year sequence from 9th through 12th grade is Geoscience, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Subject to meeting prerequisites, this sequence may be altered. In addition, students may find additional challenges of interest in elective and advanced placement courses. At the same time, Ecology and Conservation, Conceptual Physics, and Engineering Concepts are available for those requiring a more hands-on science experience. 

    Many students take more than one science course during one or more years in order to fulfill personal interests and needs. The following is the sequence of Science courses at LOHS:

    Geoscience 
    Ecology & Conservation or Biology 
    When complete Ecology & Conservation, the next course can be Conceptual Physics or Biology 
    When complete Biology, the next courses are Accelerated Chemistry or Chemistry 
    When complete Accelerated Chemistry, the next courses can be AP Chemistry, AP Biology, *Environmental Science, Anatomy or Oceanography 
    When complete Chemistry, the next courses are AP Biology or Physics 
    When complete Physics, the next course can be AP Physics C: Mechanics 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. *Course is not available in 2018-2019. 

     

    Geoscience

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This class covers Earth science themes and emphasizes scientific skill-building for all the science courses offered at LOHS. Topics include lab-skills, basic chemistry, plate tectonics, volcanoes & earthquakes, geologic time, weathering & erosion, meteorology, and astronomy. Daily lab activities are given emphasis to reinforce content covered. There is a focus on applying the material learned to the processes and events that have helped create the Oregon we see today and how it will be influenced in the future. Students should leave this course with a good understanding of Earth’s interior, crust, atmosphere, and place in the solar system as well as how to operate in a scientific laboratory setting. 

    Ecology and Conservation

    One year
    Credit: 
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Geoscience instructor

    In this class the student will explore the characteristics that typify different types of environments and the plants and animals that live there, as well as discover the biological impact of humans on these ecosystems. Through field research and lab work students will gain an understanding of why ecology and conservation are a contemporary concern. Special emphasis will be placed on Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. The course provides several opportunities to explore diversity and collect data outside of the classroom setting. 

    Biology

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Incoming 9th grade student needs to meet District criteria for admission to course

    Biology is the standard biological science course offered to 10th-12th graders. This course is organized around six major themes: 1) levels of life organization; 2) flow of energy; 3) genetics; 4) relationship between structure and function; 5) evolution; and 6) interaction of organisms and the environment. These broad themes include many biological topics, e.g. photosynthesis, survey of plants and animals, DNA technology, cell respiration, genetic diseases, bacteria, plus many others. Relating these topics to our everyday lives will be emphasized. Many laboratory experiments and activities enhance all topics in this course. 

    Conceptual Physics

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Algebra and one year of Science

    This course explores the physical universe, stressing ideas and principles and using relatively simple mathematical tools and models. The first semester covers motion and forces, collisions, machines and energy. The second semester deals with static electricity, simple electric circuits, magnetism, mirrors, lenses and wave motion. 

    Accelerated Chemistry

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Algebra and Geometry – may be taken concurrently with Geometry, excellent achievement in Science or Mathematics, plus recommendation of previous Science instructor

    The first semester includes the use of the discovery method in laboratory work so that chemical principles can be drawn directly from student experience. Topics covered are an introduction to chemistry, the kinetic theory of matter, solids, liquids and gases, and atomic structure and bonding. The second semester includes a study of energy relationships in chemical reactions, reaction rates, equilibrium reactions, solutions, acids and bases, and qualitative analysis. 

    Chemistry

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Algebra 

    The first semester includes an introduction to chemistry, atomic structure and bonding, solids, liquids and gases, and basic chemical reactions. The second semester course includes a study of solution chemistry, acids and bases, more advanced chemical reactions and qualitative analysis. 

    AP Biology

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Biology and Chemnistry and selection by application
    Recommends: Human Physiology and Anatomy to take concurrently

    Advanced Placement Biology is a college preparatory class offered to students who have completed Biology and Chemistry with high academic standing. It is also recommended that students take Human Physiology and Anatomy either concurrently or before enrolling in Advanced Placement Biology. Students enrolled in this class are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement Biology Exam and/or apply for college credit through the State System of Higher Education (Project Advance). The course will cover the following topics: biochemistry, cellular biology, cellular energetics, molecular biology, cell division, evolution, and ecology. Laboratory experiments recommended by the College Board are also an integral part of this course, providing direct experience with the concepts studied. 

    AP Chemistry

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Accelerated Chemistry

    This course consists of a deeper study of chemical systems with emphasis on laboratory activities. Topics studied will include qualitative analysis, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, reaction kinetics and organic chemistry. Students planning to take the advanced placement exam in chemistry are expected to devote additional time and energy outside of the regular class time preparing for the AP test. 

    Physics

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Advanced Algebra

    This course introduces basic laws of physics using algebraic and geometrical models to gain a deeper understanding of our physical world. Subjects covered in the first semester include motion in one- and two-dimensions, forces, momentum, work and energy. The second semester moves into heat, thermodynamics, waves and optics. 

    AP Physics C: Mechanics

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 12
    Prerequisite: Physics, Pre-Calculus and concurrent enrollment in Calculus AB, plus Selection by Application

    This course continues the concept introductions of Physics with charge, electric potential, magnetism and electromagnetic induction at the beginning of first semester. Later in the first semester motion, rotational motion, forces and energy are presented using introductory calculus as the course brings its focus to college-level mechanics. The second semester continues with momentum, gravitation, waves and oscillations providing students preparation for the AP exam in May. 

    Environmental Science (this course is not available in 2018-2019)

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Two years of Science

    This interdisciplinary course is designed to explore environmental sustainability from three perspectives: 1) the natural systems that sustain human populations, 2) the human impacts on those systems and 3) strategies to minimize environmental degradation and maximize future abundance. Specifically, this course builds ecoliteracy by examining the risks associated with growth in finite and developing world; population dynamics; non-renewable resource extraction; soil and water resources; sustainable agriculture and our food system; renewable and nonrenewable sources of energy; and principles of sustainable design. The goal of the class is to give both background about the environmental challenges we face and regenerative strategies to help design a more sustainable future through systems thinking. 

    Human Physiology and Anatomy

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry – may be taken concurrently with Chemistry

    Human Physiology & Anatomy provides an in-depth study of cells, tissues, and the major systems of the human body in order to develop an understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Some major diseases and disorders that affect each of these systems will also be investigated. This is a laboratory intensive course, with a focus on dissection for comparison to the study of human anatomy. Additionally, through individual research projects, guest speakers, and field trips, students will explore a wide variety of health-related occupations. This course is designed for students who are interested in pursuing a career in a medical field, want the challenge of a college prep science class, and/or are simply interested in how the human body works. 

    Oceanography (Dual Credit PCC)

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Geoscience and Biology

    This lab-oriented course will emphasize historical, physical and chemical oceanography, and marine biology. The labs will include waves, shoreline processes, estuary development and sedimentation, plate tectonics, and the chemistry of the sea. A marine aquarium will be studied. Animals and plants in the inter-tidal regions of Oregon will be emphasized. 


      Social Studies

    The LOHS Social Studies Program is driven by three goals. 

    The first goal involves giving students the opportunities to practice active citizenship in a democratic society. 

    Secondly, students will improve their reasoning, problem solving, and communication skills. 

    Third, enable the students to apply the perspectives and practice the skills of the social discipline. 

    The following is the sequence of Social Studies courses at LOHS: 

    World History and Geography 
    (or if approved by counselor Alt Program Social Studies 9-10) 
    US History and Government 
    American and Contemporary World or AP US History 


    Social Studies Department Electives: 
    Anthropology, AP Economics, AP European History, AP Psychology, AP US Government, Constitutional Law, Advanced Constitutional Law, Eastern Civilization, History of Western Civilization*, Introduction to Women’s Studies, Political Action Seminar, Psychology 1 and Psychology 2.

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. *Course is not available in 2018-2019. 

     

    World History and Geography

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This required ninth grade social studies course takes a conceptual approach to world history and provides students with the knowledge and skills for future social studies endeavors. Students will examine patterns of change and continuity across time and place. This course focuses on the major global transformations of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries and examines their relationship to current events. 

    Alternative Program Social Studies 9-10

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Approval of Counselor

    Alternative Program Social Studies is a sheltered World History class. The curriculum will meet the essential learning targets of the regular World History class but the teaching strategies will include differentiated vocabulary, curriculum, and assessments. The content includes world history, geography and map skills, as well as study skills like note-taking, research, and writing. The class is designed for incoming freshmen that have been identified as needing more academic skills to be successful in high school. Enrollment in this course requires approval from a counselor. 

    U.S. History and Government

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    US History and Government is one of three required social studies classes at LOHS and is traditionally taken sophomore year. The class includes early American history (pre-20th Century) and a general US government curriculum including the three branches of the federal government, civil rights, and civil liberties. Class activities include a mock trial. 

    America and Contemporary World

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This course examines the history of the United States from the late 19th Century to the present. Also, students will concentrate on contemporary issues from both global and domestic perspectives, closely examining the interaction of politics, economics, geography, society and history.

    AP U.S. History

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    This course provides a survey of American history from the period of Exploration and Discovery to the present. It requires extensive reading including a college level textbook, primary documents, supplementary readings, and interpretive essays. There is a strong emphasis on developing both factual knowledge and analytical skills. The course is also designed to prepare students to take the Advanced Placement Test in United States History. 

     

    Social Studies Electives:

    AP Economics

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra

    AP Economics is a class designed for students who want to explore advanced economic principles and concepts as they relate to a global and national economy. Areas of study will include micro and macro-economics, supply and demand, scarcity, economic performance, pricing signals, economic growth and stability, economic systems and decision-making, international trade, and the stock market. Students will conduct case studies on historical economic situations and their impact on society. The course curriculum and areas of focus will help students prepare to take the Advanced Placement test in Economics. 

    AP European History

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European History course. In AP European History, students investigate significant events, individuals, developments and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources, developing historical arguments, making historical comparisons and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, continuity and change over time. This course also provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; individual and society; and national and European identity. 

    AP U.S. Government

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    The Advanced Placement U.S. Government and Politics course is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics, law, and government. It includes the study of the philosophy of government, the history of the founding and the framing of the Constitution, the evolution of the three federal branches of government, the emergence of modern civil rights and civil liberties, and an examination of the non-governmental players (media, parties, special interest groups) that influence our political system. 

    Anthropology

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Anthropology is the study of human beings as creatures and creators of society. This course is an introduction to that study which aims to demonstrate how the basic concepts and techniques developed by cultural anthropologists help us to understand societies of various degrees of complexity, including our own. We will consider topics such as language, kinship, gender, ethnicity, economics, politics, religion, and social change in a broad comparative framework. Major goals are an increased awareness of the social and cultural dimensions of human experience; the diversity and flexibility of human cultures; and processes of inter-cultural communication and conflict. It will also be the study of societies that contrast with Western civilization, leading to an acquaintance with the concept of culture and its importance to an understanding of human behavior. Emphasis will be on understanding each culture from its own point of view rather than from our own. 

    Constitutional Law

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Beginning Constitutional Law will answer three questions: What is justice? What is law? What is our law? The first question will be "answered" by discussions of ethical philosophy ranging from Bentham to Kant. The second question will be "answered" by legal philosophy ranging from natural law to legal positivism and cross cultural approaches to law ranging from sharia to inquisitorial systems. The last question will follow the direction of student interest but will likely focus on our civil, criminal, family and constitutional legal systems. 

    Advanced Constitutional Law

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades:12
    Prerequisite: Concurrently enrolled in AP Government

    Advanced Constitutional Law is a semester-long course that prepares a team to compete in the annual We The People (Constitution Team) competition. The competition is best described as a guiding discussion/debate between a team of students and a community’s political elite. Students will be engaged in an in-depth study of philosophy, the Constitutional Convention, the Bill of Rights, the 14th amendment, and modern citizenship. To take Advanced Constitutional Law, students do not need to have taken Beginning Constitutional Law but do need to be also enrolled in AP US Government and Politics. 

    Eastern Civilization

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Eastern Civilization (ECV) is a year-long elective course. It will begin with general introductions of history & civilization. The course will then trace the development, diffusion and impact of world cultures, peoples and events upon Eastern Civilization. Our journey will include all of the following (but not limited to): Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, Iran, Russia, India/Pakistan, China, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, Japan, the Koreas and the Philippines. Our focus will be humanities-based, viewing the culture, art, architecture, engineering, literature, music, philosophy, military advancements, along with social, religious and political institutions -- throughout each unit. There will also be a strong emphasis on historical paradoxes and the connections between past, present and future studies. ECV is an excellent opportunity for students to gain a greater understanding of regions and nations of the world not traditionally covered (in-depth) through other course offerings. 

    History of Western Civilization

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This course is designed to stimulate interest, insight and appreciation in the history, foundations and development of Western Civilization. It begins with the earliest evidence of human societies, draws from the major ancient civilizations (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome) and traces the intellectual, religious, political and social conflicts of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and Reformation. Students will be asked to abstract from primary sources, literature, and art to help them reconstruct and interpret the mosaic of western culture. Attention will be given to controversial issues, major turning points, connections and recent interpretations raised by new evidence and perspectives activities and applications; simulations; creative projects, Portland Art Museum presentations, Build-a-Better Civilization, discussion, writing, debates, seminars, and role-plays will be an integral part of the learning process. 

    Introduction to Women's Studies

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    This yea

    This year long enrichment elective will survey the progression of gender roles through history, examine the concept of womanhood through various lenses, and discuss related current events, using primary and secondary source documents. The course will study women’s contributions to history, civics, and the arts. In addition, it will examine how women’s historical experiences differ from individuals of different backgrounds. This course will also analyze how race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and gender non-conformity intersect with women’s history and the overall concept of feminism. 

    Political Action Seminar

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    This class provides opportunities for youth to participate in government processes. PAS promotes active community-based experience where students can meet local and state officials and become more informed about current political issues. Students are expected to identify goals, devise strategies to meet their goals, and work with a team to implement them. Throughout the process, students gain practical experience in public communication and leadership skills. Students who are primarily interested in Oregon Youth and Government, Mock Trial Competition, Model United Nations, issue and election forums and work with city and county governments should apply for PAS. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Psychology 1

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades:10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Psychology 1 is a survey course, examining the integrated study of the mind, the brain and behavior. The class is both academic and applied. This history of psychology and the major theorists serve as foundational units. Our journey includes many of the major sub fields of psychology: personality, learning, altered states of consciousness, sensation & perception, intelligence, memory, thinking, motivation & emotion, stress & health. In addition, we examine developmental psychology: a study of the physical, emotional, cognitive, personality and social aspects of a child’s development from the prenatal period through adolescence. This course also addresses contemporary views, ethical considerations, effects of culture, gender, age, and the role of technology. Activities & applications: observations, experiments, field work, guest speakers, interviews, simulations, role-playing, presentations, team and individual projects, film studies, discussions and debates. Psychology I is a relevant, thought-provoking and valuable elective. 

    Psychology 2

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Psychology 1

    Psychology 2 is divided into two major areas of study: 

    Abnormal Psychology: In this section we will explore the historical views and current perspectives regarding abnormal behavior. Our studies emphasize major diagnostic categories and criteria, individual and social factors of maladaptive behavior and types of treatment & therapy. Psychological disorders are a major focal point, including Anxiety disorders (i.e. Generalized, Phobias, Obsessive-Compulsive, Panic and Post-traumatic Stress); Mood disorders (i.e. Depression, Bipolar and Dysthymia); along with Somatoform, Dissociative, Schizophrenia, Personality and Childhood Developmental disorders (i.e. Autism, Asperger’s, ADHD, Tourette’s, Conduct and Oppositional Defiance). We also address a wide variety of treatments and therapies, while covering the controversies and institutional changes in the American ‘Asylum’ system. Current research and topics are regularly introduced in class activities and discussions. 

    Forensic Psychology: This portion of the semester investigates the merger of Psychology and the Legal system. We will begin with a study of the history and evolution of Forensic Psychology. The primary subfields covered are: Clinical-Forensic, Developmental, Social, Cognitive and Criminal Investigative (see the chart below). Some of the other topics will include Competency vs. Insanity, Landmark Cases, Sociopathy and Psychopathy, Serial Criminality, Mental Health in Prisons, etc. 

    AP Psychology

    One Year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    The AP Psychology is a year-long course designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. 

    The major topics will include: History and Approaches, Research Methods, Biology of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, States of Consciousness, Learning, Cognition, Motivation and Emotion, Developmental Psychology, Personality, Testing and Individual Differences, Abnormal Behavior, Treatment of Abnormal Behavior and Social Psychology. Students will be assessed through vocabulary acquisition multiple choice exams, free-response questions in preparation for the AP Psychology Exam. Our course will also include a variety of in-depth discussions and activities, connecting and applying a wide array of abstract, complex concepts and dynamics in Psychology. 

    Sociology 

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    The course begins by considering sociology as a discipline in the behavioral sciences. Key concepts like group, status, role, structure, culture and norms are briefly introduced. The scientific method is considered and its relationship to sociological knowledge is presented. The topics include culture, socializing the individual, adolescence, social groups, social stratification, minorities, social institutions, the family, education, religion, and the social problem of crime. 


    Technology

    What the future holds in store for individuals, the nation, and the world depends largely on the wisdom with which humans use science and technology. Technology Integration is an important corner stone to the .com generation, social responsibility skills, and digital citizenship. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

    Digital Media

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This course is a hands-on class, which combines the study of texts and media in multiple formats to create digital authoring. In this class, students will be expected to conduct research around a variety of topics, focus on the creation of a digital project, and participate in class discussion on methods and theories of digital media. Students will learn how to design graphics, create web pages, find resources, embed audio, and create animation. The final product will feature the completion of an original piece of digital history. This course is designed for those who have an interest in exploring media in a different way. Documentaries and digital projects can be submitted to various competitions. 

    Engineering and Design (Dual Credit PCC)

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This course is designated as a science elective and does not qualify for a science credit. The major focus of Engineering and Design (IED) is the design process and its application. Through hands-on projects that emphasize teamwork, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. The class will prepare students for Engineering Concepts; however, it is not a pre-requisite. 

    Engineering Concepts (Science Credit)

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite:Geometry and one year of Science

    This survey course of engineering exposes students to some of the major concepts that engineering students will study in college. Students have an opportunity to investigate engineering and high-tech careers and to develop an understanding of engineering problem solving. The course consists of developing an understanding of how engineers approach problems and apply this learning through several projects. Some of the content includes an introduction 

    Introduction to Programming

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Geometry

    This is an introductory object-oriented Java programming course. It includes online college level curriculum and lab time to apply knowledge. It can be a single semester course, or students may prepare to take the AP Computer Science A exam by taking the course both fall and spring semesters. 

    Programming Projects

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 10-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Do you have a little programming know how, and would like to show it off? A big idea that needs time to come to fruition? A desire to learn different programming languages? Programming Projects, then, might be for you. This class is a guided, structured way for you to learn what is most interesting to you in the computer science field. The class is based on meeting the goals that you, yourself set to accomplish tasks that you, yourself, want to do. If you want to make a website, robot, video game, or anything else you can think of, this class will help provide you with the time, resources, and structure to help. 

    AP Computer Science A

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Advanced Algebra or Advanced Algebra A

    This course is aligned with the College Board’s expectations and will serve as an introduction to computer programming through the Java programming language. There will be a focus on object-oriented programming, development of algorithms and solving problems. We will use curriculum that has connections to University of Washington’s CSE 142 course along with a course syllabus from TEALS and a partnership with TEALS volunteers to help with the technical skills associated with computer programming.


    World Languages

    Chinese 1, French 1, Japanese 1, and Spanish 1

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Students will be introduced to the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. They will practice controlled conversation between students or with the teacher, and begin to acquire everyday vocabulary, basic grammatical skills and correct pronunciation. Cultural insights are included in the material being studied. Chinese language students learn Pinyin (Mandarin pronunciation system). 

    Chinese 2, French 2, Japanese 2, and Spanish 2

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of first year language

    These courses continue to practice the listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills established during the first year. The principles and practices learned the first year are reviewed and students are expected to use them as they work on new concepts, vocabulary and increased complexity of the language structure. Students are expected to be more independent learners. 

    Chinese 3, French 3 (Dual Credit – CCC), Japanese 3, and Spanish 3 (Dual Credit – CCC)

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of second year

    A recommended prerequisite for enrolling in the third year of second language is the successful completion of two years of study and the language teacher’s recommendation. Reading and writing are given more emphasis than they received at levels one and two. Literature, composition, and more aspects of the cultural heritage are included at this level and students will learn more advanced grammar concepts. 

    Chinese 4 (Dual Credit PSU 5 credits of CHN201), French 4 (Dual Credit – CCC), Japanese 4, and Spanish 4 (Dual Credit – CCC)

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of third year and Recommendation of Instructor

    Taught predominantly in the second language, these courses extend the conversational approach, with more emphasis on reading and writing. There will be outside reading of selections from literature to supplement the student's knowledge of the language. The students will be required to do more presentations and independent research. After completing the course successfully, students will be able to earn five (5) Chinese Language credits from Portland State University. 

    AP Chinese Language and Culture

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese 4, students who score 4 and above in the STAMP test for Chinese and recommendation of instructor

    The AP Chinese Language and Culture course is designed to be comparable to a fourth semester (or the equivalent) college or university course in Mandarin Chinese. It will deepen students’ immersion in the language and culture of the Chinese-speaking world, and reflects the proficiencies exhibited throughout the Intermediate range, as described in the American Council of the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Guidelines. After completing the course successfully, students will be able to earn ten (10) Chinese Language credits from Portland State University. Students will also take the AP exam at the end of the course with the possibility of receiving other college credits. 

    AP French and AP Spanish

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of fourth year and Recommendation of Instructor

    Taught exclusively in Spanish/French, this class prepares students to understand Spanish/French spoken by native speakers in a variety of settings and registers and produce speech comprehensible to native speakers. All of the materials used are cultivated from authentic sources or textbooks published for the purpose of teaching AP Spanish/AP French. Students will work on the goals of accuracy and fluency in their speaking and writing skills. Students will take the AP exam at the end of the course with the possibility of receiving college credit.


    Off-Campus Opportunities

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

     

    Automotive Fundamentals (Dual Credit – CCC)

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    An introductory automotive service class intended to provide fundamental knowledge and basic experience about automobiles. Covers automotive systems, preventive maintenance and performing basic repairs. Also provides skill and knowledge for purchasing cars, choosing quality mechanics, and making good economic decisions about repairs and costs. 

    Intended generally to enhance the overall satisfaction of being an automatic consumer and car owner. This class is taught by a CCC professor at the World of Speed in Wilsonville. Tuition and transportation provided by LOSD. 

    Cadet Teaching

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Application, Attendance criteria and Transportation

    Cadet teaching gives a student an opportunity to work with children from kindergarten through grade five at LOSD Elementary schools. Time will be spent in an elementary classroom under a certified teacher, working with students and assisting the supervising teacher. Cadet teachers will be expected to follow district and school guidelines for appropriate dress and behavior. They will also be expected to provide their own transportation to and from their assignments. Attendance is a large part of the student's grade. Absences affect their grade and the result can be a failing grade. Students who are chosen for this program will be notified of their assignment and be required to complete a contract. Class may be repeated for additional elective credit. 

    Criteria for participation in this program include the following: Good attendance, good disciplinary record, application, and an interest in working with elementary age children. 

    Early Release

    One semester or one year
    Credit: 0
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Transportation

    Students who are on track for graduation may forecast for early release. Students who have Early Release need to make arrangements for transportation and plan to be off campus during the Early Release time unless they have arranged to work with a teacher or study in the library. 

    General Auto Repair 1 (Dual Credit – CCC)

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Automotive Fundamentals

    Course material is coordinated with other auto courses. Includes live repair work and fundamentals such as safety, tools, measuring, and fasteners. This High School offering meets the requirement and allows a high school student transitioning into the college program to take AM-122 their first term. This class is taught by a CCC professor at the World of Speed in Wilsonville. Tuition and transportation provided by LOSD. 

    Late Arrival

    One semester or one year
    Credit: 0
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Transportation

    Students may forecast for Late Arrival, which would allow them to start the school day with 2nd period. Students need to be off campus until class time unless they have arranged to work with a teacher or study in the library. 

    Peer Tutor – Lake Oswego Junior High

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    This course is designed for students who are interested in working with junior high students one-on-one or in small groups to provide learning assistance and support. Students need to be willing to work with all levels of students. In addition, good interpersonal communications skills and ease in relating to people from varying educational backgrounds is important. This program is looking for students who are responsible, reliable, and punctual. Appropriate and professional behavior is expected at all times. 

    School to Farm Internship

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: None

    This dynamic course offers students the opportunity to gain a deep understanding in all aspects of food production. Students will design, prepare, plant, maintain, harvest, and sell produce on site at the City of Lake Oswego's Luscher Farm, and the city of Lake Oswego's Farmers Market. 

    Students will gain a deep understanding of the skills and knowledge necessary in plant, water, and soil ecology. Students will learn the economics and civic institutions involved in the transportation, marketing, and sale of locally produced food. Students also will work collaboratively with elementary school educators and parent volunteers in school garden programs across the district to host field trips, and teach lessons to elementary school students, about plant, water, and soil based ecology. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Small Engine Repair (Dual Credit – CCC)

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Automotive Fundamentals

    This course is designed to provide an overview of basic small engine maintenance, operation and repair. It covers safety, small engine theory, electrical systems, and troubleshooting. Classroom instruction covering theory of operation, 2 cycle and 4 cycle designs and applications, combined with hands-on live projects provides the student the opportunity to learn basic principles of small engine operation, including outdoor equipment, motorcycles, and A.T.V.'s. This class is taught by a CCC professor at the World of Speed in Wilsonville. Tuition and transportation provided by LOSD. 

    Work Experience

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Counselor and or Case Manager, Employer, Transportation, Application, Contract, Monthly Time Sheets, and Evaluation

    Students may earn Work Experience credit for an approved part-time job. Work Experience is a semester, regular school year (Sept. – June) course, that is not forecasted for. It requires an application to be turned in to a student’s counselor or case manager by the 3rd week of the semester. Upon application approval, student will receive a Work Experience Packet of forms (contract, monthly time sheets and employer evaluation), each with specific due dates to be completed during the semester. The semester of Time Sheets must total a minimum of 67 work hours. Work Experience is a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory (S/U) graded course and is not counted towards semester Honor Roll. Early graduation requests may include no more than a total of one credit (2 semesters) in Work Experience as part of the required total credits of a student’s diploma type. Course may be repeated for credit. 


    Other Educational Offerings

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

     

    Academic Mentor

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Instructor, Counselor, and/or Assistant Principal

    Academic Mentors are LOHS students that provide additional support to other LOHS students in Academic Support Center. Academic Mentors must be strong academically and able to model problem-solving strategies, and explain course-specific concepts. Students will be evaluated on an A-F grade basis. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Academic Support Center

    One semester
    Credit: 0 to .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Counselor, Teacher, or Assistant Principal

    Academic Support Center is for students who are identified as needing additional one-on-one or small group learning assistance working towards completion of one or more specific graduation requirements. This course is led by Certified Teachers with the support of Student Academic Mentors. The class will include classwork time as well as the development of advocacy, time management, and other important skills for school success. Students must come to class prepared to study and will be expected to use their time wisely during this period. Computer access will be available. 

    Department Assistant (DA)

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Instructor and Contract at start of each semester

    Students do not forecast for this class. At the beginning of each semester, students may apply to be a Department Assistant (DA) with teachers or office staff. Students selected will assist staff members in the classroom/office setting in a variety of ways as determined by the staff member they are assigned to. Students are expected to follow classroom attendance and tardy guidelines throughout the semester. Students will receive credit but will be evaluated on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Independent Study

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Instructor and Assistant Principal approval at start of each semester

    Students do not forecast for this class. At the beginning of each semester, interested students will, along with their mentor teacher, establish a learning contract that will guide them to pursue artistic, research, design, or other projects that extend learning and provide challenges. Independent Study is an independent study program designed for students who have demonstrated exceptional proficiency in a curriculum area. Students may undertake an independent study as long as they have taken all appropriate course prerequisites and have approval of sponsoring teacher and assistant principal before registration. 

    Peer Mentor

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Application and selection

    The Peer Mentoring class allows students to interact with and model for their Special Education peers at LOHS. Peers interact with students at their worksites and in classes. Classes may include general education classes, electives, special education classes or applied work classes. Worksites include Laker Spirit Store, Joe’s Boathouse, Laker Garden, Coffee Cart, and Kitchen. Peers will be assigned based on special education student need. Duties include, but are not limited to, modeling appropriate behavior, one to one interaction, and teacher support. Requirements include application and weekly reflection paper. Class may be repeated for credit. Peers taking this class for the first time are graded S/U. All others are given a letter grade. 

    Peer Tutor – Lake Oswego High School

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Selection by Application

    This course is designed for students who are interested in working with students one-on-one or in small groups to provide learning assistance and support. Students need to have demonstrated proficiency in several curricular areas and be willing to work with all levels of students. In addition, good interpersonal communications skills and ease in relating to people from varying educational backgrounds is important. This program is looking for students who are responsible, reliable, and punctual. Appropriate and professional behavior is expected at all times. 

    Study Hall

    One semester
    Credit: 0
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: None

    Study Hall is provided for students who need extra time at school to complete homework and projects. Students will need to come to class prepared to study and will be expected to use their time wisely during this period. Computer access will be available in the study hall area. Peer Tutors are also available in most Study Halls. 


    Supportive Programming

    All Supportive Programming courses at LOHS are IEP Placement courses that require the recommendation of a Special Education Case Manager or IEP Placement Team. 

    Note: Course offerings are subject to change. 

     

    ACCESS Learning Support Center

    One year
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    Learning Support Center (LSC) teaches strategies to be a successful student. Students learn organizational skills, study skills, test taking strategies, time management and self-advocacy skills. This class also incorporates active reading strategies to increase comprehension and fluency. A learning specialist provides specially designed instruction for students as outlined in their individual education plans. Students receive tutorial support to help with completion of regular class assignments. Course may be repeated for credit. 

    Applied Work Experience

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Case Manager Permission

    This is an individually paced class that addresses the student’s transition IEP goals. Skills include completing task assignments with fading supervision to increase independence and on task behaviors, focus on quantity and quality of work produced, self-advocacy skills, including asking for help or additional assignments as needed. Options include, but are not limited to: Joe’s Boathouse (a student-run business), Laker Spirit Store, the cafeteria kitchen, Laker Garden, recycling, coffee service, and office mailings. Duties are assigned by Case Manager. These options will be tailored to individual student needs as determined by the IEP team. This course is repeatable for elective credit. This course may also be used to fulfill the required Career Related Learning Experience or elective credits for graduation with a modified diploma. 

    Community Access

    One year
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Case Manager Permission

    Community Access is divided into three parts: Classroom lessons, community-based outings to apply skills, and review of practice for increased independence. Students will rotate between going out in the community and application of skills in the classroom (For example: students will go out to the grocery store for one class and then cook during the next.) Overall goal is to increase independence in the community and improve skills. Students will develop skills in daily planning, time management, social etiquette, safety, use of public transportation, as well as money management, cooking and shopping. Skills covered also include accessing the community by utilizing Tri-Met and school transportation. Students routinely access Lake Oswego area locations including, but not limited to: banks, post office, library, grocery stores and other locations. Class can be repeated for elective credit.  

    English Applications

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    English Application is an English class designed for students who have individual education plans with significant needs in the areas of reading and writing instruction. Visual thinking strategies are used to improve literacy skills including reading, writing, thinking, speaking, and listening. More emphasis is also placed on using English skills in real-world applications. It is designed to build skills in order to move into general education English classes with or without modifications. This course may be used to fulfill the required English credits for graduation with a modified diploma. 

    English Explorations

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    English Explorations is an English class designed for students who have individual education plans with significant needs in the areas of reading and writing instruction. Visual thinking strategies are used to improve literacy skills including reading, writing, thinking, speaking and listening. This course may be used to fulfill the required English credits for graduation with a modified or alternate diploma. 

    English Fundamentals

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    This is an individually paced class that addresses the student’s IEP goals in reading, writing and math using visual thinking and learning strategies directed towards the student's preferred learning system. Curriculum will be tailored to individual student needs as determined by the IEP team. This course may be repeated for credit. 

    English Lab Learning Support Center

    One year
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    English Lab LSC is intended to further develop students’ foundation skills in written language and reading by using parallel curriculum sources to supplement and support the general education benchmarks. Students are provided direct, specially designed instruction that reflects their IEP goals and objectives. Additionally, students receive tutorial assistance to complete general education class assignments and support in the areas of study and organizational skills. 

    Health Fundamentals

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    This course may be used to fulfill the Health requirement for graduation with a modified diploma. Health is divided into 2 nine week sections. The first nine weeks focuses on calming strategies, fitness, healthy eating, first aid and safety. During the second nine weeks, this course uses the Family Life and Sexual Health Curriculum: FLASH and/or Circles. Goals of this state and board approved curriculum include providing the opportunity for students to increase knowledge about human development and reproduction, to respect and appreciate themselves, their families and all persons, and to learn to not exploit others or allow themselves to be exploited. The class also utilizes the concept of the “trusted adult”, someone the student identifies with, outside of school, to talk privately and honestly about questions, concerns or problems about growing up. Students will receive additional support using visual thinking strategies for language development and social/thinking development in initial class. Class can be repeated for credit. 

    Independent Study – Pathways

    One year
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    This is an individually paced class that addresses the student’s IEP goals that may include but are not limited to academics, communication, mobility, physical therapy, occupational therapy and assistive technology. These options will be tailored to individual student needs as determined by the IEP team. This course may be repeated for credit. 

    Learning Support Center

    One year
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    Learning Support Center teaches strategies to be a successful student. Students learn organizational skills, active learning strategies & study skills, test taking strategies, time management and self-advocacy skills. This class also incorporates strategies for written expression and active reading strategies to increase comprehension and fluency. A learning specialist provides specially designed instruction for students as outlined in their individual education plans. Students receive tutorial support to help with completion of regular class assignments. Students needing daily support may repeat class for credit without earning a letter grade. 

    Math Applications

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    Math Applications is designed for students who have individual education plans and are working at a pre-algebra level. The pace of the curriculum is individualized and runs at a slow pace for continued work on basic skills. This course may be used to fulfill the required math credits for graduation with a modified diploma. 

    Math Explorations

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    Math Explorations is a math class designed for students who have individual education plans with significant needs in the area of math. Basic math skills are taught in preparation for functional math out of high school to working on pre-algebra skills. Students’ needs are determined by IEP goals. Concepts are re-taught and practiced throughout the school year. This course may be used to fulfill the required math credits for graduation with a modified or alternative diploma. 

    Math Fundamentals

    One year
    Credit: 1
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    This is an individually paced class that addresses the student’s IEP goals in reading, writing and math using visual thinking and learning strategies directed towards the student's preferred learning system. Curriculum will be tailored to individual student needs as determined by the IEP team. This course may be repeated for credit. 

    Social Cognition

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Case Manager Permission

    Social Cognition assists students in developing social awareness, social motivation, and social communication skills. Students receive direct instruction as outlined in their Individualized Education Program (IEP) to enhance social & executive functioning skills and promote independence. The class provides opportunities to practice a variety of skills to initiate and maintain social interactions with peers and adults. Th 

    Transitional Fundamentals

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Case Manager Permission

    This is an individually paced class that addresses the student’s transition IEP goals. Course includes development of transition portfolio: resume, interest inventories and other resource information. Discussions include appropriate on the job behaviors, working with coworkers and bosses, how to self-advocate, problem solve and prioritize. Topics also discussed include: how to participate in IEP meetings and a review of weekly job coach evaluation for those students participating in applied work classes. This course is used to fulfill IEP transition goals, the required Career Related Learning Experience (CRLES) and elective credits for graduation with a modified diploma. Based on IEP team recommendation and student transition goals, this class may be repeated every year. 

    Transition to Careers

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    Transition to Careers assists students with meeting their goals to transition to a community college, vocational program or entry level job. The curriculum covers career research and the community college application process. Students learn about financial aid, disability disclosure, available accommodations and post-secondary services. We discuss workplace skills, interview skills and finding, getting and keeping a job. In addition, students will learn about, banking and budgeting for independent living, housing, transportation, and accessing community agencies. Students take field trips to college campuses and various employment sites. Some class time is allotted for academic support. 

    Transition to College

    One semester
    Credit: .5
    Grades: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Recommendation of Case Manager

    Transition to College prepares students for the community college or 4-year college setting. The curriculum covers career research and college majors, the application process, financial aid, disability disclosure, and accessing available accommodations and post-secondary services. In addition, students will learn about entry level employment, banking and budgeting for independent living, housing, transportation, and accessing community agencies. Students take field trips to college campuses and various employment sites. Some class time is allotted for academic support. 

Lake Oswego High School Co-Curricular Activities and Clubs

  • LOHS offers a rich array of co-curricular activities which make up an important part of a student’s comprehensive high school experience. Every student is encouraged to select one or more in which to participate. Clubs are created and organized by LOHS students and vary from year to year based on interest. *Examples of past and current categories and clubs are: 

    Academic

    Computer Science, Creative Writing, National Ocean Science Bowl Club, Prep (ACT/SAT/AP) Club 

    Careers

    Business Club, Coding Club, Engineering Club, Pre-Med Club, SFM Animation Club 

    Community School/Service – Inreach

    Best Buds Club, Random Acts of Kindness, S.E.E.D.S. Club, “Sit with Us” Club, Site Council, Unity Club 

    Community/School Service – Outreach

    Child Aid Club, Key Club, Operation Smile Club, Red Cross Club, Travis Manion Club 

    Competition – Club

    Badminton Club, Nerf or Nothin’ Club, Speech & Debate Club, Table Top Gaming 

    Competition – Club Sports

    Fall- Water Polo Winter-Equestrian, Snowboarding, Water Polo Spring-Equestrian & Lacrosse 

    Competition – Interscholastic Athletics

    Fall-Cheerleading, Cross Country, Dance Team, Football, Soccer, Volleyball 

    Winter- Basketball, Cheerleading, Dance Team, Skiing, Swimming, Wrestling 

    Spring- Baseball, Golf, Softball, Tennis, Track 

    Discussion

    Christian Students United Club, Diversity Club, Empowerment Club, Fellowship Club, Furry Club, Gay Straight Alliance, Skincare Club, Young Life, World Peace 

    Fine Arts – Music

    Guitar Club, LO Brass Club, Music is Medicine Club 

    Fine Arts – Performing

    Acting Club, Drama Club 

    Fine Arts – Visual

    Photography Club, Visual Arts Club 

    Honor Societies

    LOHS Omega Chapter of the National Honor Society, Rho Khappa National Honor 

    Leadership/Student Government/Political

    LOHS School Event Committees, LOHS Student Senate, Junior Statesmen of America, Model UN, Young Libertarian, Young Democrats Club, Young Republicans 

    Recreation and Hobby

    Cooking & Baking Club, Fiction Club, Fishing Club, Hack (Hacky Sacking)Club, Hiking Club, Rubik’s Cube Club, Soccer Club, Ultimate Frisbee Club, Yoga Club 

    World Culture

    International Culture Club, Italian Club, Chinese Club, Jewish Student Union Club 

Time Management Estimates

  • Estimated average number of hours of homework per week estimates.

    Based upon teachers' survey responses on the estimated weekly hours of homework for a sampling of courses at Lake Oswego High School. The Time Management Worksheet that follows will help you anticipate the amount of homework that these, and non-listed courses, may require.

English

Family and Consumer Studies

Fine Arts

Health

Leadership

Math

Physical Education

Science

Technology

Social Studies

World Languages